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The 19th Amendment at 100: A Centennial Reassessment, Focusing on Sex, Race, and Memory
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The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
09/25/2020
ABCs of the Rule of Law
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This activity asks students to provide rule of law words for each letter of the alphabet. When all letters have been completed, the teacher may ask students to look for common themes that reflect key principles of the rule of law. Teachers may choose to use this activity as a springboard for discussing the rule of law or as a review.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Civics
Economics
English Language Arts
History
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Law
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Center for Teaching the Rule of Law
Provider Set:
Instructional Resources
Author:
Timothy Isaacs
Date Added:
08/06/2013
Anna and the Scholarship of Slavery and Abolition
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In November 1815, a woman known only as "Anna" leapt from the third floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C., after she was sold to Georgia traders and separated from her family. Abolitionist writers seized on her story, depicting her act as an attempted suicide. Her act prompted a Congressional inquiry into kidnapping and the interstate slave trade. For two hundred years, however, her identity and her ultimate fate remained unknown. In 2015, her petition for freedom filed in the Circuit Court for D.C. came to light in the O Say Can You See: Early Washington D.C. Law and Family collaborative research project. Her name was Ann Williams. She sued for her freedom in court and won. This webinar will consider the significance of her case in the history of slavery and abolition and explore her case as a window into the current scholarship on slavery and abolition.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
William Thomas
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Anna and the Scholarship of Slavery and Abolition Clip #1—Creative Writing and Historical Scholarship
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Clip 1/5. In November 1815, a woman known only as "Anna" leapt from the third floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C., after she was sold to Georgia traders and separated from her family. Abolitionist writers seized on her story, depicting her act as an attempted suicide. Her act prompted a Congressional inquiry into kidnapping and the interstate slave trade. For two hundred years, however, her identity and her ultimate fate remained unknown. In 2015, her petition for freedom filed in the Circuit Court for D.C. came to light in the O Say Can You See: Early Washington D.C. Law and Family collaborative research project. Her name was Ann Williams. She sued for her freedom in court and won. This webinar will consider the significance of her case in the history of slavery and abolition and explore her case as a window into the current scholarship on slavery and abolition.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
William Thomas
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Anna and the Scholarship of Slavery and Abolition Clip #2—Common Timeline of Abolition and Slavery
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Clip 2/5. In November 1815, a woman known only as "Anna" leapt from the third floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C., after she was sold to Georgia traders and separated from her family. Abolitionist writers seized on her story, depicting her act as an attempted suicide. Her act prompted a Congressional inquiry into kidnapping and the interstate slave trade. For two hundred years, however, her identity and her ultimate fate remained unknown. In 2015, her petition for freedom filed in the Circuit Court for D.C. came to light in the O Say Can You See: Early Washington D.C. Law and Family collaborative research project. Her name was Ann Williams. She sued for her freedom in court and won. This webinar will consider the significance of her case in the history of slavery and abolition and explore her case as a window into the current scholarship on slavery and abolition.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
William Thomas
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Anna and the Scholarship of Slavery and Abolition Clip #3—Historiography of Slavery and Abolition
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Clip 3/5. In November 1815, a woman known only as "Anna" leapt from the third floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C., after she was sold to Georgia traders and separated from her family. Abolitionist writers seized on her story, depicting her act as an attempted suicide. Her act prompted a Congressional inquiry into kidnapping and the interstate slave trade. For two hundred years, however, her identity and her ultimate fate remained unknown. In 2015, her petition for freedom filed in the Circuit Court for D.C. came to light in the O Say Can You See: Early Washington D.C. Law and Family collaborative research project. Her name was Ann Williams. She sued for her freedom in court and won. This webinar will consider the significance of her case in the history of slavery and abolition and explore her case as a window into the current scholarship on slavery and abolition.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
William Thomas
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Anna and the Scholarship of Slavery and Abolition Clip #5—Teaching Slavery and Abolition
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Clip 5/5. In November 1815, a woman known only as "Anna" leapt from the third floor window of a tavern in Washington, D.C., after she was sold to Georgia traders and separated from her family. Abolitionist writers seized on her story, depicting her act as an attempted suicide. Her act prompted a Congressional inquiry into kidnapping and the interstate slave trade. For two hundred years, however, her identity and her ultimate fate remained unknown. In 2015, her petition for freedom filed in the Circuit Court for D.C. came to light in the O Say Can You See: Early Washington D.C. Law and Family collaborative research project. Her name was Ann Williams. She sued for her freedom in court and won. This webinar will consider the significance of her case in the history of slavery and abolition and explore her case as a window into the current scholarship on slavery and abolition.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
William Thomas
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Annotated List of Suggested Visual Arts
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The Center's Annotated List of Suggested Visual Arts currently contains 16 works of art which we have annotated to show how they might be used to teach the rule of law. After each entry you will find a link or links to the image and other useful information to use with your classes. (Please note that some of these links may have expiration limits unknown to us that will require teachers to conduct their own search for the image.) In some cases we have suggested pairings of works based on common rule of law-related themes. We also encourage you to use the REED-LO Scaffolding Approach to Art (http://www.ruleoflaw-vba.org/uploads/1/5/7/7/15777460/rol_project_site_-_reedlo_1.pdf) and the REED-LO Matrix templates (https://www.thecenterforruleoflaw.org/uploads/1/5/7/7/15777460/reed-lo_matrix.pdf) to create your own lesson plans for these works. If you create your own lesson plans and wish to share them with us, we will add them to the site with full attribution to you as developer of the plan.

Subject:
American Studies
Applied Science
Architecture and Design
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Civics
Ethnic Studies
Gender Studies
Graphic Arts
History
Law
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Data Set
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Center for Teaching the Rule of Law
Provider Set:
Rule of Law and the Visual Arts
Author:
Timothy Isaacs
Date Added:
08/31/2012
“Are You Free to Read, See, and Hear?": Creating Consumer Rights out of the First Amendment
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Do you have the right to read any book you want? See any movie you want? Listen to any radio program you want? Do your students? Yes! (with a very few exceptions) These rights to consume are protected by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. But during the Amendment’s two-hundred-twenty-eight unchanging years at the top of our Bill of Rights, it has only protected consumers for the past sixty years. This webinar will help you think, teach, and argue about how, when, and why the First Amendment came to protect consumers’ rights and also what has been lost and what has been gained through that transformation.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Leigh Ann Wheeler
Date Added:
09/12/2019
BackStory Collection
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The BackStory Collection contains 154 episodes from the popular public radio series and podcast on timely topics in American history. The series, which delves into the history, or “backstory” of current events and ideas in the U.S., is produced by Virginia Humanities, a state humanities council tasked with connecting Virginians to their state’s history and culture. BackStory began as a monthly public radio show in 2008 with hosts Ed Ayers, Peter Onuf, and Brian Balogh known collectively as “The American History Guys.” In 2017, BackStory began publishing as a podcast only. Onuf transitioned to a consulting and guest host role and historians Nathan Connolly and Joanne Freeman joined the team. In episodes, BackStory’s hosts, all renowned historians and educators, discuss connections between the present and the past in a way that, according to the show’s website, “makes learning about history like going to a lively cocktail party.” Along with the hosts, episodes regularly feature guest historians and questions from audience callers. Episodes in the collection feature conversations about how subjects with deep roots in American history and culture – censorship, conspiracy theories, maps, dating and courtship, death and mourning, the color green, taxation, guns, populism, satire, and women in politics – have impacted American lives, often in surprising ways. Subjects in this collection include American history, women, race, racism, social life, education, religion, politics, economics, health, immigration, war, and holidays. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Education
History
Journalism
Law
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Virginia Humanities
Date Added:
05/07/2016
Bowers v Hardwick, 1986
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Public Domain
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Facts of the case
Michael Hardwick was observed by a Georgia police officer while engaging in the act of consensual homosexual sodomy with another adult in the bedroom of his home. After being charged with violating a Georgia statute that criminalized sodomy, Hardwick challenged the statute's constitutionality in Federal District Court. Following a ruling that Hardwick failed to state a claim, the court dismissed. On appeal, the Court of Appeals reversed and remanded, holding that Georgia's statute was unconstitutional. Georgia's Attorney General, Michael J. Bowers, appealed to the Supreme Court and was granted certiorari.
Question
Does the Constitution confer a fundamental right upon homosexuals to engage in consensual sodomy, thereby invalidating the laws of many states which make such conduct illegal?

Subject:
History
Law
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Oyez
Date Added:
11/17/2020
Center for Teaching the Rule of Law: Supplemental Texts for Teachers
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Teachers will find resources for examining American art as a vehicle for teaching American history and culture; resources that address foundational documents from Western Europe that influenced the American Founders as they struggled to create a new nation; and works that address the rule of law concept and its connections to such related issues as justice, good and evil, right and wrong, freedom and responsibility, equal rights, fairness, and citizenship.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Civics
Law
Political Science
Social Science
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Center for Teaching the Rule of Law
Provider Set:
Rule of Law Readings and Documents
Author:
Timothy Isaacs
Date Added:
08/31/2009
Challenges of Sexual Misconduct on College Campuses
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This is adapted from a program created by U.S. Magistrate Judge Robert S. Ballou.  The following activity exposes students to the timely issue of sexual misconduct on college campuses.  While not every student will attend college, every student should understand their personal rights protected by the Bill of Rights.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Civics
Law
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Simulation
Provider:
Center for Teaching the Rule of Law
Provider Set:
Instructional Resources
Author:
Robert Ballou
Date Added:
08/31/2017
Climate Change Conversations: Causes, Impacts, Solutions
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Climate scientists and activists have used the venue of public broadcasting to discuss climate change for more than a quarter of a century. They have repeatedly communicated the science of human-driven climate change and its impacts in interviews, call-in radio shows, debates, public lectures, news programs, and documentaries.
While scientists and activists have consistently used public broadcasting to disseminate information about climate change, the conversation has changed over time. In the 1980s, focus was primarily on communicating the potential threats of global warming. Since then, programming has increasingly examined the actual impacts, and in addition, struggled to keep the American public informed and engaged. This exhibit highlights public broadcasting recordings of conversations on climate change—its causes, impacts, and proposed solutions—from 1970, the first year that Earth Day was celebrated, to the present. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Agriculture
Applied Science
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Civics
Communication
Environmental Studies
History
Journalism
Law
Life Science
Physical Science
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Casey Davis Kaufman
Date Added:
05/07/2015
Conservation Controversies: Public Lands in the American West
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Between 1891 and 1939 a substantial portion of the land area of states in the American West were set aside for management by the federal government. These so-called “public lands” have been a source of contention ever since, engendering conflict among an assortment of stakeholders looking to use the lands for a variety of purposes—from conservation and habitat protection to mining, grazing, and logging. Fellow Joseph E. Taylor III, professor of history at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, is working on a new project examining the legislative history surrounding land conservation in the Progressive era—a story that gave shape to 47% of the West.
In this podcast, Taylor discusses how the controversies surrounding land conservation represent a disconnect between popular conceptions of these lands and more technical understandings rooted in legislation passed by Congress. Often accompanied by population displacement, the term “conservation,” Taylor shows us, cannot be taken at face value—nor can the term “public.” By recentering the political economy surrounding federal lands, which are better understood not necessarily as public lands but as government lands, Taylor’s analysis reveals a “messier” and more complicated story than the one usually told.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Environmental Studies
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Discovery and Inspiration Podcast
Author:
Joseph E. Taylor III
Date Added:
08/26/2019
Constitute: The World's Constitutions to Read, Search, and Compare
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New constitutions are written every year. The people who write these important documents need to read and analyze texts from other places. Constitute offers access to the world’s constitutions so that users can systematically compare them across a broad set of topics — using an inviting, clean interface. Constitute includes the currently-in-force constitution for nearly every independent state in the world, as well as some draft and historical texts. We continue to update the in-force texts as they are amended or replaced, and we plan to expand the selection of draft and historical texts available on the site as well. Arabic Constitute and Spanish Constitute each include more than 50 currently-in-force constitutions, representing every region in the world, as well as some draft and historical texts.

Subject:
Civics
General Law
Law
Legal History
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Comparative Constitutions Project at the University of Texas at Austin
Date Added:
04/26/2020
Corporate Law: LEX220 and Commercial Law: LEX150
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Through this module, which can be incorporated in both LEX 220-Corporate Law and LEX 150-Commercial
Law, students will Students will learn about the European Union, as it relates to corporate law, international commerce, and corporate criminal liability. Students will learnabout the connections between
corporate enterprise and organized criminal activity within international commerce and the
global market. The concepts of international dispute resolution and diplomacy will be covered.
Students will analyze how various laws can be used to pursue civil and criminal penalties by the United States,
various European nations and countries included within the European Union. Finally, students will understand the role of international commerce within corporate enterprise, and commercial law.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
UNC World View
Provider Set:
NC Global Distinction Globalized Community College Course Modules
Author:
Precious L. Vines
Date Added:
05/26/2019
The Corpus Juris Civilis: A Guide to Its History and Use
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The Corpus Juris Civilis is indispensable for Roman law research. It is a vital pillar of modern law in many European nations, and influential in other countries. Scholars and lawyers still refer to it today. This valuable publication, however, may seem impenetrable at first, and references to it can be hard to decipher or detect. This guide provides a history of the Corpus Juris Civilis and the forms it has taken, states why it is still an important resource today, and offers some tips and tools for research using it.

Dingledy, Frederick W. "The Corpus Juris Civilis: A Guide to Its History and Use." Library Staff Publications 123 (2016).

Subject:
Law
Legal History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Frederick W. Dingledy
Date Added:
04/13/2021
Correspondence Between General MacArthur and Walter White, December 23, 1950
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Correspondence between General Douglas MacArthur, Commander of United Nations Forces in Korea, and Walter White, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, requesting MacArthur okay entry for Thurgood Marshall to represent the high number of African American soldiers who had been brought up on courts-martial during the Korean War.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Law
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
MacArthur Memorial
Date Added:
09/21/2020