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Black Feminism in Action
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This activity is part of a course on Black Feminist and Womanist Theology and Theory. The current activity is intended for the second class lecture, which introduces learners to the so-called first wave of black feminism. One primary underlying tenet is that the “first wave” did not usually (if ever) refer to themselves as black feminists, or feminists at all.  Their writings, speeches and activism qualify as black feminist work based on our contemporary understandings of such.  

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
Shari Madkins
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/22/2020
Constructing Landscapes in a Caribbean Context
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Through this lesson, students will be able to identify how the formal elements of various documents produce representations of the Caribbean as a complex and layered space impacted by slavery, industry, agriculture, and colonial and touristic desire. They will be able to describe the differences between textual and visual representations of landscape and articulate how form impacts content. Building on an understanding of the multiplicity of ways the same space can be represented, they will also be able to critically interrogate the rhetoric of representative media.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Cultural Geography
English Language Arts
Literature
World History
World Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
Natalie Catasús
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/21/2020
Interrogating the Red Summer through Newspapers
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The following in-class exercise calls upon students to dissect narratives of the Red Summer of 1919 using a provided collection of primary documents pulled from the Visualizing the Red Summer project. This activity can be done individually or in groups. The sensitive nature of the documents, which may include descriptions of violent events may privilege group work. Depending on the students’ prior exposure to the subject matter, they may find space to discuss and process with their peers cathartic. 

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/19/2020
The Show Must Go On: Patrick Allitt on The Alaska Pipeline and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (1989)
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In this six-minute video lecture, Prof. Patrick Allitt discusses the Alaskan Pipeline, domestic oil production, and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (1989). This lesson includes Allitt's lecture with slides, a primary source (the National Response Team's Report to the President, 1989), and questions to guide student discussion. Patrick Allitt is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and an OAH Distinguished Lecturer. He was an undergraduate at Oxford in England (1974-1977), a graduate student at the University of California Berkeley (Ph.D., 1986), and held postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard Divinity School and Princeton University. At Emory since 1988, he teaches courses on American intellectual, environmental, and religious history, on Victorian Britain, and on the Great Books. Author of seven books (most recently A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of Environmentalism, 2014), he is also presenter of eight lecture series with "The Great Courses" (www.thegreatcourses.com), including "The Art of Teaching” and, most recently, “The Industrial Revolution.”

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Environmental Studies
History
Law
Legal History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
Patrick N. Allitt
U.S. History Scene
Date Added:
05/28/2020
The Show Must Go On: Patrick N. Allitt on The California Gold Rush
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Professor Patrick Allitt discusses the California Gold Rush in a five-minute video lecture. This lesson also includes a primary source--a letter from one gold rush participant to his cousin--and questions to guide student discussion. Patrick Allitt is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University and an OAH Distinguished Lecturer. He was an undergraduate at Oxford in England (1974-1977), a graduate student at the University of California Berkeley (Ph.D., 1986), and held postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard Divinity School and Princeton University.  At Emory since 1988, he teaches courses on American intellectual, environmental, and religious history, on Victorian Britain, and on the Great Books.  Author of seven books (most recently A Climate of Crisis: America in the Age of Environmentalism, 2014), he is also presenter of eight lecture series with "The Great Courses" (www.thegreatcourses.com), including "The Art of Teaching” and, most recently, “The Industrial Revolution.”

Subject:
American Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
US History Scene
Date Added:
05/27/2020