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Constructing Landscapes in a Caribbean Context
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Through this lesson, students will be able to identify how the formal elements of various documents produce representations of the Caribbean as a complex and layered space impacted by slavery, industry, agriculture, and colonial and touristic desire. They will be able to describe the differences between textual and visual representations of landscape and articulate how form impacts content. Building on an understanding of the multiplicity of ways the same space can be represented, they will also be able to critically interrogate the rhetoric of representative media.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Cultural Geography
English Language Arts
Literature
World History
World Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
Natalie Catasús
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/21/2020
Landscapes of Power in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower
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In this lesson, students will analyze landscape imagery in Octavia E. Butler’s 1993 dystopian novel, Parable of the Sower.The lesson conceptualizes “landscape” and “environment” broadly to include the natural world, manmade structures, social and communal networks, and even the solar system. Analysis questions prompt students to identify connections between diverse landscape depictions and the socioeconomic conditions that define the protagonist’s world. Through close reading, students investigate Butler’s critique of power as a barrier to constructing equitable and sustainable communities. 

Subject:
American Literature
Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
E. Gale Greenlee, Ph.D.
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/16/2020
My Humanities Moment: Finding my Landscape
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I first read Landscape for a Good Woman: A Story of Two Lives by Carolyn Kay Steedman as an undergraduate in a class on anthropology, history and memory. The class was meant to blur the disciplinary lines between Anthropology and History by forcing students to articulate what makes a history a history and what makes a memory a memory. Steedman asks the readers to consider an additional question: what makes a story a story? Who is able to tell a story and what types of stories are able to be told? Steedman’s answer to the question is the concept of “landscape.”  To tell a story and for that story to be heard requires a landscape, a place for the characters of the story to step into. Once a story is told – once it has a landscape to animate into – it ceases to be a story and instead becomes a piece of history, an “interpretive device” for other stories to use in their own construction.

Subject:
Anthropology
History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Katy Lindquist
Date Added:
07/12/2020
Trench Warfare Video Lecture
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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The war of movement is over, the war of attrition has begun. Defensive trenches stretch 475 miles from the English Channel to Switzerland’s mountains. Over the next years, neither side is able to gain the advantage and success is often measured by the gain of mere yards of territory. Millions of men are killed and wounded. Barbed wire, machine guns, chemical weapons, and tanks figure prominently in this new troglodyte world. Both sides desperately seek a path to victory. Between 1915 and early 1917, they fail.

Subject:
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
MacArthur Memorial Education Programs
Date Added:
01/05/2022
The Why of Where: Teaching Identity in Landscape and Literary Texts
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CC BY-NC
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Often, when teaching about identity, there is an over-emphasis on chronology without strong enough consideration given to geography. The use of geospatial thinking allows interactions of place, space, time, and scale to be more obvious, allowing students to develop the ability to answer not only “where?” but “why there?”In this session, participants will learn about the intersection of identity and landscape. Participants will learn about strategies for students to talk about how they identify, how that identity interacts with culture, and how culture shapes perspective.  We will feature literary and film examples with perceived/defined roles, including resources in Spanish.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Andy Mink
NHC Education
Jennifer Nichols
Date Added:
02/08/2021