Updating search results...

Search Resources

247 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • slavery
1619 Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The project was based on a proposal by Hannah-Jones to dedicate an issue of the magazine to a re-examination of the legacy of slavery in America, at the anniversary of the arrival of the first slaves to Virginia. The plan was to challenge the notion that American history began in 1776. The initiative quickly grew into a larger project. The project encompasses multiple issues of the magazine, accompanied by related materials on multiple other publications of the Times as well as a project curriculum developed in collaboration with the Pulitzer Center, for use in schools. The project employed a panel of historians and support from the Smithsonian, for fact-checking, research and development. The project was envisioned with the condition that almost all of the contributions would be from African-American contributors, deeming the perspective of black writers an essential element of the story to be told.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Interactive
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Jeff Nesbitt
Date Added:
06/11/2020
3 Doors into 33,000 Voyages
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The purpose of this resource is to put the wealth of information contained in the Slavevoyages Database at the pupils’ fingertips.The tasks are staged with the aim that pupils will swiftly approach the database with interest; with targeted aims and with a degree of historical professionalism.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
Katie Hunter
Date Added:
05/13/2020
Abolition and Revolution
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This poem by Phillis Wheatley demonstrates how enslaved and free black people saw the American Revolution as an opportunity to end the systematic oppression of black people in the colonies. This resource comes from Women & the American Story (wams.nyhistory.org), a free curriculum website from the New-York Historical Society that connects educators with classroom resources that illuminate diverse women's contributions to the American past.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
New-York Historical Society
Provider Set:
Women & the American Story
Author:
New-York Historical Society
Date Added:
05/07/2019
Abolitionist Movement
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson from the New-York Historical Society, students will learn about the abolitionist movement and consider how those who participated in it spread their messages.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New-York Historical Society
Author:
New-York Historical Society
Date Added:
07/23/2020
Abraham Lincoln on the American Union: "A Word Fitly Spoken"
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

By examining Lincoln's three most famous speeches the Gettysburg Address and the First and Second Inaugural Addresses in addition to a little known fragment on the Constitution, union, and liberty, students trace what these documents say regarding the significance of union to the prospects for American self-government.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
03/25/2020
Abraham Lincoln's 1855 Letter to Joshua Speed
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Abraham Lincoln and Joshua Speed met in Springfield, Illinois, during the 1830s. Although Speed returned to his native Kentucky, they remained friends throughout life. In this letter, Lincoln expresses his thinking about slavery, which contrasted with Speed, who grew up on a plantation and owned slaves. The year before Lincoln wrote this letter, the Kansas-Nebraska Act passed Congress, repealing the Missouri Compromise of 1820, and opened the territories to slavery. The passage of this bill proved a turning point in Lincoln's career. As he observed, "I was losing interest in politics, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again."

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Date Added:
02/07/2022
Abraham Lincoln's Letter to George Robertson
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

"George Robertson was a Kentucky lawyer and professor who once served as legal counsel for Abraham Lincoln and other Illinois heirs of Robert Todd, Lincoln's father-in-law. During one of Lincoln's absences from Springfield, he dropped off a copy of his speeches and writings on slavery and other topics. In his response to this, Lincoln expresses his pessimism about the prospects of gradual emancipation and the way Americans now regarded liberty. The letter closes with the reference Lincoln would use three years later in his famous "House Divided" speech"

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Abraham Lincoln
Date Added:
02/07/2022
Accuracy and Authenticity in a Digital City
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Imagine strolling through Baltimore 200 years ago. The narrow, unpaved streets lead you past public markets and taverns, grand mansions, and tiny alley houses. The Federal Hill observatory towers over the harbor, its shipyards, and its wharves. As you leave the tightly packed streets near the water, the houses become farther apart, interspersed with the jail, a hospital, a seminary, an almshouse, long ropewalks. You pass fields and gardens, patches of forest and orchards. The virtual landscape in which you are immersed—because, of course, you have not traveled back in time—is beautifully textured and lavishly detailed, a Google Street View for the past.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Anne Sarah Rubin
Date Added:
10/15/2020
Africa and the Atlantic World
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

The presentation explores the political, social, and religious history of the states, kingdoms, and empires of African from roughly the fifteenth century through the twentieth century. It looks at the slave trade within Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
10/08/2020
African American Christianity, Pt. I: To the Civil War
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The story of African-American religion is a tale of variety and creative fusion. Enslaved Africans transported to the New World beginning in the fifteenth century brought with them a wide range of local religious beliefs and practices. This diversity reflected the many cultures and linguistic groups from which they had come. The majority came from the West Coast of Africa, but even within this area religious traditions varied greatly. Islam had also exerted a powerful presence in Africa for several centuries before the start of the slave trade. Catholicism had even established a presence in areas of Africa by the sixteenth century. Preserving African religions in North America proved to be very difficult. The harsh circumstances under which most slaves lived rendered the preservation of religious traditions difficult and often unsuccessful.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
TeacherServe
Author:
Laurie F. Maffly-Kipp
Date Added:
04/29/2005
African American Civil War Service
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson from the New-York Historical Society, students will learn about African American contributions to the Union army's war efforts during the American Civil War and consider why Black soldiers volunteered to serve.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New-York Historical Society
Author:
New-York Historical Society
Date Added:
07/23/2020
African-American Communities in the North Before the Civil War
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

One of the heroes of the Battle of Bunker Hill was Salem Poor, an African American. Black people fought on both sides during the American Revolution. Census data also reveal that there were slaves and free Blacks living in the North in 1790 and after. What do we know about African-American communities in the North in the years after the American Revolution?

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
03/25/2020
Africans in America
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

In some ways he was a lucky man. To be sure, finding yourself in bondage on a Virginia tobacco plantation was not the result of good luck, but Anthony Johnson would rise above his low status and undoubtedly become the envy of many colonists.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
PBS
Date Added:
03/02/2021
After the American Revolution: Free African Americans in the North
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

About one-third of Patriot soldiers at the Battle of Bunker Hill were African Americans. Census data also reveal that there were slaves and free Blacks living in the North in 1790 and later years. What were the experiences of African-American individuals in the North in the years between the American Revolution and the Civil War?

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
03/25/2020
America and the Transatlantic World
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this volume, scholars and educators share resources to better teach America's place and role in the Transatlantic World.  The iBook contains audio lectures, primary source documents, and lessons designed to engage students in inquiry and investigation.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
Andy Mink
Date Added:
06/02/2020
American Abolitionism and Religion
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The cause of immediate emancipation, as the abolitionists came to define it, had a different germ of inspiration from those Enlightenment ideals that Jefferson had articulated: the rise of a fervent religious reawakening just as the new Republic was being created. That impulse sprang from two main sources: the theology and practice of Quakerism and the emergence of an aggressive, interdenominational evangelicalism. Both movements arose in England and America during the Age of Enlightenment—the eighteenth century. The pietism of the Quakers, a radically egalitarian Protestant sect, asserted the love of God for every human being, regardless of color, sex, or station in life.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Religious Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
TeacherServe
Author:
Bertram Wyatt-Brown
Date Added:
04/29/2008
America on the World Stage: America and the Transatlantic World
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Recognizing the urgent need for students to understand the emergence of the United States’ power and prestige in relation to world events, America on the World Stage: A Global Perspective to U.S. History (Organization of American Historians, 2008) reframes the teaching of American history in a global context. Each essay covers a specific chronological period and approaches fundamental topics and events in United States history from an international perspective, emphasizing how the development of the United States has always depended on its transactions with other nations for commodities, cultural values, and populations. For each historical period, the authors also provide practical guidance on bringing this international approach to the classroom, with suggested lesson plans and activities. America on the World Stage Teaching AmericanHistory grant is a five year project (2009-14) that brings the book of the same name to life through a seriesof interactive lectures, hands-on workshops, research and curriculum design, and summer travel courses. Our approach will be to explore the international perspectives of American history through a series of benchmark topics.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Economics
Higher Education
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Module
Primary Source
Author:
Andy Mink
Date Added:
04/14/2020
The Amistad
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

After slaves revolted and took control of the Amistad in 1839, Americans captured the ship off Long Island and imprisoned the slaves in New Haven. A US Supreme Court trial in which Roger Sherman Baldwin and John Quincy Adams defended the slaves, ultimately won them their freedom.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Connecticut Humanities
Date Added:
08/24/2020