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10th's and Decimals
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In this video segment from Cyberchase, the CyberSquad replaces a piece of track to get the Madre Bonita Express to the Mother's Day harvest.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
U.S. Department of Education
WNET
Date Added:
07/24/2008
The 1950s and the Cold War
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In the early years of the Cold War, fear of the Soviet Union led some Americans to conclude that Soviet subversion was destroying American society from within. If not actual spies, then certainly enemies — some deliberate apostles of Communism, others unwitting dupes — were everywhere: in the universities, in the entertainment industry, in journalism, even in the federal government. What fueled the anti-Communist frenzy? How did it manifest itself? What impact did it have on American life?

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Steve Whitfield
Date Added:
02/19/2012
The 1950's in American History and Memory: The Way We Never Were
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How do we remember the 1950s? As the climax of the American Century, when returning GIs and their wives settled into suburbia to have lots of children and enjoy the fruits of living in the only major industrial power left standing after World War II? Or as an age of conformity and anxiety, when anyone who challenged the status quo was suspect and Americans were poised to retreat to fall-out shelters? Or both? Join us to explore how we remember those mid-century years and learn why those memories matter now.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Volker Janssen
Date Added:
03/17/2016
1964 Alaska Earthquake
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This video adapted from the Valdez Museum & Historical Archive, explores what happened during the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 through original footage, first-person accounts, and animations illustrating plate tectonics.

Subject:
Geology
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
11/04/2008
The 19th Amendment
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The 19th Amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. Congress passed the amendment in June 1919. Suffragists lobbied local and state representatives to ensure its subsequent ratification by the states.

Subject:
Civics
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
James Madison's Montpelier
Provider Set:
Suffrage in America
Date Added:
05/13/2016
The 19th Amendment at 100: A Centennial Reassessment, Focusing on Sex, Race, and Memory
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The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
09/25/2020
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #1—The Myth of Seneca Falls
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Clip 1/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #2—Helen H Gardener
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Clip 2/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #3—The Colorado Example
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Clip 3/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #4—HHG in DC
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Clip 4/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #5—Passing the 19th Amendment
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Clip 5/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 4th Industrial Revolution: Responsible & Secure AI
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CC BY-NC
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We know that AI-powered cyber-physical systems (CPS) will scale in society. The challenge we face now is how we do that responsibly and sustainably? If we act proactively, we can avoid some of the negative impacts we have seen during other technological leaps. We need to start creating now for that future 30 years hence, when we are completely embedded in both a digital and physical environment, and are experiencing a climate unrecognisable from the climate of today [...] for a future characterised by economic prosperity, social equality and wellbeing, and environmental sustainability."

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Computer Science
Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Genevieve Bell
Date Added:
04/13/2021
75th Anniversary of the End of World War II Commemoration with Ian Toll Virtual Lecture
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Video recording of a lecture and Q and A by renown historian and author Ian Toll about his book "Twilight of the Gods: War in the Western Pacific, 1944-1945" and the end of World War II in the Pacific Theater.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
MacArthur Memorial
Author:
Hampton Roads Naval Museum
Ian Toll
MacArthur Memorial Education Programs
Date Added:
09/03/2020
THE ACCULTURATION PODCAST
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Focusing on the concept of Food  Acculturation in the United States, this podcast aims to engage and inform our audiences by presenting  stories, interviews, discussions and  archives of the interviews, transcripts, photographs, and footnotes, that address the question: How has Food Acculturation shaped international graduate students in the USA?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Jhonatan Henao-Muñoz
NHC Education
Margherita Berti
Date Added:
05/21/2020
Abandoning Ship: USS Yorktown and the Battle of Midway
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From the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum's "In This Great Struggle: The Greatest Generation Remembers World War II" temporary exhibit, this video lecture discusses the USS Yorktown and the Battle of Midway.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
Author:
ALPLM
Date Added:
10/02/2019
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage
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History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #1—Introduction
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Clip 1/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #2—Family Papers
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Clip 2/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #3—Portraits
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Clip 3/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021