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AFRO AMER 101: Introduction to African American Studies 2019
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African American Studies 101 is a multidisciplinary course that embodies the empirical study of history, politics, culture, religion and other areas within thesocial sciences. The essential focus is on the life experiences of peoples of African descent in the United States and globally. The course integrates the works of scholars of ancient African civilization, New World enslavement of African Americans, economics, literature, arts, race, women studies, government and sport studies. Furthermore, through the interdisciplinary lifeline of African American Studies, this course will give special attention to black athleticism.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
10/09/2020
AFRS 4010/6610: African Diaspora Theory/Diaspora & Transnational Theories 2020
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This course aims to familiarize students with major concepts and theories related to the study of the African Diaspora primarily, though not exclusively, in the Americas (North, South, and Central). This course links, compares, and contextualizes the historical experiences of African descendants in the U.S., the Caribbean, South America, and Africa within global processes of enslavement, colonialism, and systematic oppression. The course treats the African Diaspora as 1) historical phenomenon 2) a current condition of social, economic, and political life and 3) a way of imagining the future. We will explore theories of slavery, race, and capitalism; black resistance; post-emancipation economies and current-day neoliberalism; theories of gender; environmental justice in the African Diaspora; and theories of the black digital sphere.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
10/09/2020
AP World History Syllabus
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The course is designed for students to develop a greater understanding of global processes and interaction between all human societies. The course follows a thematic approach which will highlight the nature of international continuities and changes, their causes and consequences, and comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge in conjunction with interpretive issues and many types of historical evidence. Beginning with the start of civilization, focusing on the past millennium, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that influence developments throughout history. The course begins with the rise of civilizations and extends through the modern world.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
10/27/2020
AP World History Syllabus
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AP World History is designed to develop a greater understanding of global processes and interaction between all human societies.  This understanding is advanced through a combination of factual knowledge and analytical skills.  The course follows a thematic approach which will highlight the nature of international continuities and changes, their causes and consequences, and comparisons among major societies.  The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge in conjunction with interpretive issues and many types of historical evidence.  The course will also focus on learning to write mechanically in the “AP style”.  Beginning in earnest around 1250, focusing on the past millennium, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that influence developments throughout history.  The course begins with the rise of civilizations and extends through the turmoil of the modern world. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
05/25/2022
AP World History Syllabus
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This AP world history course was designed based on five themes: Interactions between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. The course explores historical events from the 13th century through the 20th century. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
05/27/2021
Accessible Syllabus: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Politics of Identity
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This class is designed to emphasize student experience. To do this, we engage in a flipped classroom model. We have curated a variety of texts from various disciplinary and artistic practices in order to ensure most, if not all, students find something which excites them. However, are less interested in presenting these perspectives as unqualified truth and more interested in developing critical reflection skills.To do this, we will utilize a number of pedagogical tools. These tools include personal reflections, group-oriented worksheets that help students understand course readings, and informal analysis of contemporary examples of identity politics as they intersect with students' lives. Finally, in order to emphasize the communal aspect of learning, we have designed our course policies with the aim of equity and inclusion. We will offer multiple venues for participation both in person and remotely. Further, we employ contract grading which will allow us to negotiate the level of labor required to achieve various grades. This will allow students to make informed choices about how they engage in our course. 

Subject:
Gender Studies
Philosophy
Sociology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Elvira De La Torre
NHC Education
Akshay Ganesh
Tp Coughlin
Date Added:
07/15/2022
American Indian Sovereignty Syllabus
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This 16-week course examines Native American sovereignty from the perspectives of Historical Studies and Anthropology. It covers the history and unique position of American Indian Nations in relation to American political systems, as well as the politics within these indigenous groups as independent nations. The Historical Studies perspective will focus on understanding the historical context of Indian-White relations, while the Anthropology perspective will explore the variety of Native American perspectives on these relations from within their own cultures. 

Subject:
Anthropology
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
05/24/2021
Ancient Worlds Syllabus
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This 6-week course centers on the origins of human beings and the emergence of civilization and includes the study of India, Greece, and Rome as seen thought the development of democratic forms of government. 

Subject:
Ancient History
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Unit of Study
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
05/19/2021
Behind Image and Sound
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We like to be entertained. We document our lives in images, we surround ourselves with sound--an ability that has democratized with technological innovation. But the technology we use to produce these documents or enjoy them is not determinative. Rather, these technologies are also historically constructed, the result of clashes between ideas, innovation, and visions of what societies and individuals need, whether to profit, to produce meaning, or to escape into imagination.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Kate Jewell
Date Added:
01/08/2021
Bioethics Reading List and Recommendations
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This resource contains bioethics resources on various topics, including: disability, feminism, imperialism, ethnocentrism, etc.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Carly Schnitzler
Sarah K. Sawicki
Date Added:
07/24/2020
Boundary-Marking in Human Experience:  Literature, History, Rhetoric
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Marking and enforcing boundaries between groups underlines much human experience. What does it mean to set a boundary, as an individual, as a group? What is valuable and what might be problematic about drawing boundaries? We discourse about and enact boundaries along lines of gender, ethnicity, class, race, and religion. Resulting identities are policed from outside and self-ascribed from within. Across fourteen weeks, we will explore how methods of identity formation and boundary enforcement persist across history even as specific strategies morph and change. As boundaries can also serve exclusionary means… How are boundaries negotiated and what forms of resistance erupt to (re)write boundaries? How are boundaries established and maintained over time?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Joanna Chromik
Robert Carpenter
Frank Lacopo
Fernan Gomez-Monedero
Date Added:
07/14/2021
Buried Cities and Lost Tribes: New World Syllabus
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This 16-week course is an introduction to archaeology through discoveries and the researchers who made them. Emphasis on methods of archaeological fieldwork and what these discoveries reveal about humanity, including the nature of archaeological inquiry, the development of human social groups, the changing role of religion in evolving societies, the origins of agriculture, the origins of settled lifeways, the rise of cities and complex societies, political strife across different cultures and the forces which fragment societies. Examples drawn from North America, Central America, and South America. 

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Collective Memory through Performance
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Often we think of memory as an individual, private endeavor. However, memory is also a collective experience: one that is public, produced, and reproduced over time. In this course, we will examine tensions among ways of remembering through various modes of performance across time and nation. With monuments and museums, plays and film, we will develop new ways of thinking about the performative nature of memory making. We will actively engage with anti-racist and social justice media to interrogate acts of memory from the ground up.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Lindsey Waldenberg
Richard Daily
Irene Gasarah
Genevieve Guzmán
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Constructing Ourselves: Materials, Discourse, and Identity
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This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of how in-group and outsider discourse shapes different types of identities. Throughout the term, we will consider the different ways in-group and outsider discourse manifests in our daily lives and the ways in which those discourses can shape our individual and collective identities.This course aims to introduce students to different disciplinary perspectives on discourse and conceptualizations of identity, as well as the effects of various cultural, environmental, and sociopolitical factors on identity formation. Upon completion of the course, students should have summary knowledge of in-group and out-group behavioral theories; acquired basic understanding of the different forms in which in-group and outsider discourse manifests; and developed further their ability to critically analyze and interpret discourse across several mediums and genres.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Linguistics
Political Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Mai Nguyen Do
Thatcher Seltzer-Rogers
Grace Benner Kim
Date Added:
07/15/2022
Course Syllabus - Online Communities as Agents of Change
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Syllabus - Online Communities as Agents of ChangeInterested in teaching a course that introduces student to how online spaces present and enact change in our societies? Well, this is the course for you. This serves as a template that may be edited at the instructors descression. 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Education
Sociology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Ahmet Aksoy
Carolyn Levy
Christine Nick
Cristovao Nwachukwu
Date Added:
12/11/2020
Culture(s) of Language Syllabus
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An interdisciplinary syllabus that layouts the plans for an upper-level undergraduate class that focuses on language as a process that is social, cultural, political, and so on. 

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Linguistics
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Syllabus
Author:
Robyn Johnson
César Hoyos Álvarez
Samuel Munroe
Date Added:
07/15/2022
English 696e: Spatial & Visual Rhetorics
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Both spatial and visual rhetorics attend to issues of boundaries. From the structure of our classroom spaces to the margins of the page, rhetoricians and compositionist are investigating the ways spatial and visual experiences are impacting our work as scholars and teachers.This syllabus was designed by Amy Kimme Hea for English 696e at University of Arizona.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Author:
Tatiana Seijas
NHC Education
Date Added:
04/25/2020
Environmental History in the Early Modern Atlantic World Syllabus
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The purpose of this course is to familiarize undergraduate students with environmental history as a discipline, as well as introduce them to the Atlantic World as a region of study by focusing on the late fifteenth through mid-nineteenth centuries. This course does not assume previous experience with history courses and is intended to be a broad survey that encompasses several global regions. The course is arranged both thematically and geographically and emphasizes environmental change in the context of the eastern and southern coasts of the United States, the Caribbean, central and southeastern Mexico, Brazil, West Africa, and the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts of Europe throughout the early modern period. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
05/25/2022
Environment and the Humanities
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Environment and Humanities seeks to foster an interdisciplinary space for students to engage with nature. The Humanities offer a unique academic space for considering different ways of being and knowing and intersects with programs and communities typically not considered in the traditional liberal arts space (i.e. Biology, Economics, Psychology, etc.). With this in mind, we will explore not only works of literature, film, and poetry, but also the history of human contact with the natural world and the communicative practices and findings of the hard sciences. The emerging crisis of climate change will of course be a central and recurring concern of the course and will engage content across cultures, demographics, and academic majors to see how we can confront this crisis across the academy.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Environmental Studies
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Rho Townsley
A.F. Lewis
Jewel Parker
Cameron Winter
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Food and Culture in Practice - Syllabus
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This is a 14-week course that examines the regional, ethnic, cultural, and historical relationships that communities can develop toward food. We will be discussing the role of food in cultural concepts like memory and family, real-world issues like access and labor, and food in discursive practices like recipe-writing and food journalism. In addition to thinking critically about food and how it is represented, this course will also focus on how modalities and genres affect the way that audiences understand food or the practice of making it.

Subject:
Communication
Journalism
Sociology
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Author:
Jiaxin Zhang
NHC Education
Luis Higinio
Amanda Kong
Date Added:
07/25/2022