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  • American Archive of Public Broadcasting
BackStory Collection
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The BackStory Collection contains 154 episodes from the popular public radio series and podcast on timely topics in American history. The series, which delves into the history, or “backstory” of current events and ideas in the U.S., is produced by Virginia Humanities, a state humanities council tasked with connecting Virginians to their state’s history and culture. BackStory began as a monthly public radio show in 2008 with hosts Ed Ayers, Peter Onuf, and Brian Balogh known collectively as “The American History Guys.” In 2017, BackStory began publishing as a podcast only. Onuf transitioned to a consulting and guest host role and historians Nathan Connolly and Joanne Freeman joined the team. In episodes, BackStory’s hosts, all renowned historians and educators, discuss connections between the present and the past in a way that, according to the show’s website, “makes learning about history like going to a lively cocktail party.” Along with the hosts, episodes regularly feature guest historians and questions from audience callers. Episodes in the collection feature conversations about how subjects with deep roots in American history and culture – censorship, conspiracy theories, maps, dating and courtship, death and mourning, the color green, taxation, guns, populism, satire, and women in politics – have impacted American lives, often in surprising ways. Subjects in this collection include American history, women, race, racism, social life, education, religion, politics, economics, health, immigration, war, and holidays. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Education
History
Journalism
Law
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Virginia Humanities
Date Added:
05/07/2016
Climate Change Conversations: Causes, Impacts, Solutions
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Climate scientists and activists have used the venue of public broadcasting to discuss climate change for more than a quarter of a century. They have repeatedly communicated the science of human-driven climate change and its impacts in interviews, call-in radio shows, debates, public lectures, news programs, and documentaries.
While scientists and activists have consistently used public broadcasting to disseminate information about climate change, the conversation has changed over time. In the 1980s, focus was primarily on communicating the potential threats of global warming. Since then, programming has increasingly examined the actual impacts, and in addition, struggled to keep the American public informed and engaged. This exhibit highlights public broadcasting recordings of conversations on climate change—its causes, impacts, and proposed solutions—from 1970, the first year that Earth Day was celebrated, to the present. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Agriculture
Applied Science
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Civics
Communication
Environmental Studies
History
Journalism
Law
Life Science
Physical Science
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Casey Davis Kaufman
Date Added:
05/07/2015
Education Reporting on Public Television
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CC BY-NC-ND
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From black-and-white footage of protests against segregated schools in New York City, to full-color newscasts about the rollout of No Child Left Behind in Guam, public television has had a long history of covering education stories. This online exhibit highlights documentaries, news magazines, talk shows, and special reports in the AAPB collection dedicated to learning in America. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Civics
Communication
Education
History
Journalism
Law
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Amanda Reichenbach
Date Added:
05/07/2019
En Français Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The En Français Collection consists of 223 episodes (1980-1993) of the only original Louisiana Public Broadcasting series broadcast entirely in French. It also includes 25 clips of unedited footage shot for the series. The series was produced in partnership with the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana (CODOFIL) during a time of renewed pride in Louisiana’s French cultural heritage. It presented interviews, stories, and performances in French that were of interest to the state’s French speakers and helped to fulfill LPB’s mission of preserving the French language in Louisiana. The themes of the series include: the preservation of the Cajun French dialect; Acadian history and cultural traditions; life in the Acadiana region of Louisiana; the enduring connection between Louisiana and the Francophone world; interviews and performances by the pioneers and stars of Cajun music; and performances by Le Théâtre ‘Cadien, a local theater group from Lafayette that performed original plays in the Cajun French dialect. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Cultural Geography
Education
English Language Arts
History
Journalism
Language Education (ESL)
Languages
Linguistics
Performing Arts
Social Science
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Council for the Development of French in Louisiana
Louisiana Public Broadcasting
Date Added:
05/07/1993
The Evolution of Jazz Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The Evolution of Jazz Series Collection is made up of 40 episodes of The Evolution of Jazz series, originally broadcast from WGBH from 1953-1954. The Evolution of Jazz was an hour-long weekly radio show that traced the musical and cultural history of jazz from its early years to contemporary forms. The series was produced, written, and hosted by Nathan “Nat” Hentoff, a jazz historian, author, music critic, and civil liberties advocate, who went on to be the first non-musician to be named an NEA Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2004. In 1964 the National Educational Radio Network, a precursor to NPR, re-broadcast the series. Episodes of The Evolution of Jazz focused on influential jazz artists and important periods in jazz history, and frequently used recordings to supplement discussions and illustrate jazz styles. Subjects include Duke Ellington, Ragtime, Chicago Jazz, Dave Brubeck, New Orleans Jazz, West African musical influences, Ella Fitzgerald, and the blues. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
History
Musicology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Northeastern University by the Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council
WGBH (Boston)
Date Added:
05/07/1945
Eyes on the Prize Interviews Collection
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The Eyes on the Prize I Interviews Collection consists of 127 raw interviews conducted with participants in the American Civil Rights movement, covering the years from the mid-1950s through to 1965. The interviews were recorded by Henry Hampton and the Blackside production company as part of the acclaimed documentary series Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965. The series originally aired on PBS in 1987, and was followed by a second series in 1990, Eyes on the Prize: II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965-1985. The series garnered several Emmy awards, a Peabody, and an Academy Award nomination, and is considered the definitive documentary on the Civil Rights Movement. The recordings include cuts, incidental conversation, production notes, and segments with sound but not film; some interviews are sound only. The questions asked of interviewees are usually audible, and interviews range in length from ten minutes to two hours. The interviews were reconstructed and digitized from the original film materials by the Film & Media Archive at Washington University. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Henry Hampton
Washington University Film and Media Archive
Date Added:
05/07/1987
Freedom Riders Interviews Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The Freedom Riders Interview Collection contains 124 raw interviews from the American Experience documentary of the same name. The film documents the six-month period from May to November 1961, when white and black activists rode together on buses across the American South to protest the continued segregation of public buses and transportation facilities. Risking attack from white mobs and arrest by local police, the documentary chronicles the reality of the Freedom Riders' experiences and success at calling attention to southern indifference to federal law and demanding enforcement of integrated interstate bus travel. The Freedom Riders interviews were conducted with activists and journalists who took part in the Freedom Rides, including John Lewis, a key player in the Civil Rights Movement and a member of the House of Representatives; Diane Nash, a coordinator for Freedom Riders in Nashville; Moses Newson, a journalist who covered the first Freedom Ride; John Seigenthaler, a Special Assistant to Robert F. Kennedy; and Genevieve Hughes Houghton, Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) field secretary on their Freedom Ride. Subjects discussed include the Supreme Court, the American South, Jim Crow, the Ku Klux Klan, violence, racism, segregation, CORE, and the Civil Rights Movement. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Civics
Communication
History
Journalism
Law
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
WGBH (Boston)
Date Added:
05/07/2011
"Gavel-to-Gavel": The Watergate Scandal and Public Television
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In February 1973, James Karayn, the president of the National Public Affairs Center for Television (NPACT), public broadcasting’s unit in Washington responsible for producing national news-related programming, had the daring idea of broadcasting the Senate Watergate hearings in full, or “gavel-to-gavel,” rebroadcasting each day’s complete proceedings in the evening for those unable to watch during the day. The result was one of the most popular series in public broadcasting history. From May 17 to November 15, Americans all over the country tuned in for the 8 PM ET taped coverage, catapulting a public television system in its infancy into the national consciousness. Viewers were captivated by the memorable personalities behind the senators’ table, the stories—equal parts fantastical, banal, and horrifying—told by the witnesses before the Committee, and the revelations that threatened to force President Richard Nixon out of office. And through it all, they had the steady, balanced commentary of anchors Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer, who stowed their editorializing to allow viewers to come to their own conclusions. This online exhibit presenting the evening rebroadcasts (as well as the subsequent broadcasts of the House Impeachment hearings) will allow contemporary viewers to experience the hearings as so many did in 1973, in full, “gavel-to-gavel.” The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Civics
Communication
Criminal Justice
History
Journalism
Law
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Amanda Reichenbach
Date Added:
05/07/2018
In Black America Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The In Black America collection from KUT in Austin, Texas, is made up of 745 episodes of In Black America, which were preserved and digitized in 2019, thanks to a Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). In Black America, which began in 1970 and continues to be broadcast weekly, features hundreds of interviews with influential members of the black community in conversation about issues and topics pertaining to black America, including education, style, economics, social issues, families, culture, literature, and politics. Episodes in the collection are from a batch of recently-rediscovered tapes spanning from 1981-2004, featuring interviews by host and producer John L. Hanson, Jr., who has hosted the series since 1980. Episodes feature speeches by and interviews with artists, athletes, civil rights leaders, teachers, politicians, businesspeople, and social scientists, including comedian and activist Dick Gregory; journalist Susan L. Taylor, who was editor-in-chief of Essence from 1981-2000; writer, photographer, filmmaker, and composer Gordon Parks, Sr.; opera singer Barbara Conrad; the Rev. Jesse Jackson; and poet and educator Nikki Giovanni. Subjects in the collection include race and ethnicity, sports, journalism, activism, education, and black culture and history. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Cultural Geography
History
Journalism
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
KUT Radio (Austin)
Date Added:
05/07/2020
John Beyer Iowa Documentaries Collection
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The John Beyer Iowa Documentaries Collection is comprised of 22 documentaries that writer-producer-director John H. Beyer III (1939 – 2002) made with the Iowa Educational Broadcasting Network (IEBN) and its successor, the Iowa Public Broadcasting Network (IPBN) between 1969 and 1978. After studying communications at Syracuse University and gaining documentary filmmaking experience at Milwaukee and Cleveland television stations, Beyer, a Des Moines native, returned home in 1969 to join KDIN-TV, a precursor to IEBN. Over the next decade, Beyer created award-winning documentaries in the form of “film essays” that gave voice both to everyday Iowans and societal outsiders. Most of Beyer’s documentaries, focusing on local institutions and issues, were shot on film with small crews (including, in most cases, cinematographer-editor Ron Burnell) in order to better immerse the viewer in the often intimate worlds he recorded. Documentaries in the collection are representative of Beyer’s work, and include Beyer’s first documentary, “Promise City,” about a small Iowa farming community in decline; “Kiss the Girls and Make Them Cry,” winner of the 1971 Ohio State Film Festival Award, about young women in a home for unwed mothers; “Cheryl,” about Cheryl Browne, the first African-American Miss America contestant; and “Take Des Moines – Please,” the Emmy-award-winning tongue-in-cheek exposé of the state capital’s transportation crisis that gave Beyer national recognition. Subjects in the collection include local issues in Iowa, disability, race, music, aging, treatment of animals, education, and agriculture. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Agriculture
Applied Science
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Civics
Communication
History
Journalism
Law
Life Science
Physical Science
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Iowa Educational Broadcasting Network
Iowa Public Broadcasting Network
John H. Beyer III
Date Added:
05/07/1978
Ken Burns' The Civil War Interviews Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Ken Burns’ The Civil War Interviews Collection consists of eight full interviews conducted by Burns with historians, writers, and commentators concerning the history and politics of the American Civil War. The interviews were recorded on film by Ken Burns and associates between 1986 and 1988 as part of Ken Burns’ award winning documentary, The Civil War, which originally aired on PBS stations from September 23rd to September 27th, 1990. The recordings include cuts, incidental conversation, production notes, and segments with sound but not film, and vary in length between 30 minutes and 1.5 hours. The questions asked of interviewees are usually audible. The interviews were digitized as part of the 25th anniversary restoration of the original film and provided to the AAPB in fall 2016. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Education
History
Law
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Florentine Films
Ken Burns
Date Added:
05/07/2017
National Educational Television Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The National Educational Television (NET) Collection consists of more than 10,000 television programs from non-commercial TV stations and producers from 1952-1972 on public affairs, social issues, arts, culture, the humanities, science, and education. The collection includes public affairs documentaries and discussions covering the black freedom struggle, the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and issues such as poverty, student activism, radicalism, privacy, the environment, the elderly, and welfare. There is also a wide range of arts, cultural, and science programming visually documenting opinions and works of major authors, artists, musicians, filmmakers, scientists, and intellectuals. The programs in this collection were created for television broadcast, as well as classroom and adult educational uses. Digitization of the NET collection is ongoing, and digitized programs are periodically added to the Online Reading Room. Many of the catalog records include transcriptions from original programming notes, press releases, and distribution memoranda that were copied onto microfiche in the 1980s by PBS. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Communication
Education
English Language Arts
History
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Date Added:
05/07/1972
On the Right: NET and Modern Conservatism
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"On the Right: NET and Modern Conservatism" was curated in 2019 by Dr. Allison Perlman, Associate Professor of Film & Media Studies and History at University of California, Irvine, as part of the National Educational Television (NET) Collection Catalog Project funded by the Council on Library and Information Resources. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Civics
History
Journalism
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Allison Perlman
Date Added:
05/07/2020
PBS NewsHour Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The PBS NewsHour Collection includes more than 13,500 episodes of PBS NewsHour’s predecessor programs from October 1975 to October 2018, including The Robert MacNeil Report (1975), The MacNeil/Lehrer Report (1976 – 1983), The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour (1983 – 1995), The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer (1995 – 2009), and PBS NewsHour (2009 - 2018). The programs aired nationwide on public television stations, five nights a week. Covering national and worldwide news and public affairs, the programs feature interviews with leading newsmakers including presidents, Supreme Court justices, members of Congress, secretaries of state, and with world leaders, including the Shah of Iran, Ayatollah Khomeini, Fidel Castro, Muammar Khadafy, Yasser Arafat, Menachem Begin, Boris Yeltsin, Vaclav Havel, Nelson Mandela and Margaret Thatcher. The collection includes extensive coverage of U.S. election campaigns, African-American history, global and domestic health care, poverty, technology, immigration debates, the end of the Cold War, terrorism, the economy, climate change, energy issues, religion, education issues, rural life, scientific exploration, poetry and the media. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Civics
Communication
Economics
Education
History
Journalism
Law
Social Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
Greater Washington Educational Television Authority (WETA)
NewsHour Productions LLC
PBS NewsHour
Date Added:
05/07/2009
Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Historic preservation is more than just saving old buildings from the bulldozer. Histories can be shared or silenced depending upon the preservation of places that represent a larger story. Historic preservationists have long used public broadcasting to make history tangible through buildings and landscapes across America. National programs, local news and magazine shows, radio call-ins, and interviews reveal the remarkable and ordinary places Americans have used to share stories about their communities. Looking at broad themes in historic preservation, this exhibit will explore the many ways Americans have created a dialogue through public media about these places that embody local and national histories. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Applied Science
Archaeology
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Civics
Cultural Geography
Economics
History
Journalism
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Kara Zelasko
Date Added:
05/07/2018
Say Brother Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The Say Brother Collection includes programs and original interviews created for Say Brother (1968 – 1997), WGBH's longest running public affairs television program by, for and about African Americans now known as Basic Black (1998 – present). The entire digitized collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and 83 programs and interviews are available in the AAPB Online Reading Room. Since its inception in 1968, Say Brother has featured the voices of both locally and nationally known African American artists, athletes, performers, politicians, professionals, and writers including: Muhammad Ali, Maya Angelou, Thomas Atkins, Amiri Baraka, Doris Bunte, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farrakhan, Nikki Giovanni, Odetta Gordon, Benjamin Hooks, Jesse Jackson, Hubie Jones, Mel King, Eartha Kitt, Elma Lewis, Haki Madhubuti, Wallace D. Muhammad, Charles Ogletree, Babatunde Olatunji, Byron Rushing, Owusu Sadaukai, and Sonia Sanchez. Topics covered by the collection include Black Power, healthcare, international affairs, human rights, police relations, prisons, religion, desegregation, Native American rights, politics, education, community and national organizations, affirmative action, business, the Equal Rights Amendment, Africa, and activism, among others. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Civics
Communication
Cultural Geography
History
Journalism
Law
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
WGBH (Boston)
Date Added:
05/07/1997
Speaking and Protesting in America
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CC BY-NC-ND
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“Speaking and Protesting in America,” presents a diverse range of public radio and television content including radio programs, local news, raw footage, and interviews that reveal the profound impact of the First Amendment on American life. Focusing on our right to speak, assemble, and petition, this exhibit explores the role of dissent in American life in its protected and unprotected expressions ranging from peaceful marches to acts of civil disobedience. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Civics
Communication
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Gender Studies
History
Journalism
Law
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Michelle L. Janowiecki
Date Added:
05/07/2017
Stonewall Uprising Interviews Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

The Stonewall Uprising Interviews Collection is comprised of 48 raw interviews from the American Experience documentary of the same name. The documentary discusses the Stonewall riots, a six-day period beginning on June 28, 1969, during which the LGBTQ community protested against a police raid on a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn, in Greenwich Village, NYC. Stonewall Uprising discusses societal attitudes towards the gay community and early activism for gay rights prior to the riots, as well as the riots’ legacy, which includes the creation of a movement for gay rights, greater cohesion among the LGBT community, and the establishment of the first gay pride parades. Interviews took place with community leaders, activists, and authors, including Martha Shelley, a Stonewall veteran, activist for gay and lesbian rights, and one of the first four members of the Gay Liberation Front; Ed Koch, former mayor of New York City; Virginia Apuzzo, a gay rights activist and former Executive Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force; Seymour Pine, Deputy Inspector of the NYPD Morals Division; and Dick Leitsch, an activist and the first gay reporter to write about the Stonewall riots. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Gender Studies
History
Journalism
Law
Legal History
Life Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
WGBH (Boston)
Date Added:
05/07/2011
Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media
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CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

What’s a newsmagazine? Though the term may seem unfamiliar, newsmagazines number among the most successful television and radio programs in recent history. Taking a cue from both commercial and experimental precedents, independent public broadcasting stations began to adopt the format during the 1970s. The newsmagazine has since persisted on public media as an alternative and localized approach to nightly news shows common on mainstream networks and larger public television stations. "Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media" examines both the content and structure of newsmagazines, and situates the format within the context of how our public broadcasting system has evolved since the Public Broadcasting Act was signed into law in 1967. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Journalism
Social Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Exhibits
Author:
Alejandra Dean
Date Added:
05/07/2017
To the Moon Interviews Collection
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CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

The To the Moon Interview Collection contains 146 raw interviews from To the Moon, a two-hour NOVA documentary that originally aired in 1999. The interviews, filmed in 1998, provide insights into the personal experiences of those who worked on NASA’s Apollo program that took humankind to the moon. The documentary tells the story of the space race between the US and the Soviet Union starting in the mid-1950s and focuses on major events in the race to reach the moon, including the launch of Sputnik, President John F. Kennedy’s 1962 announcement at Rice University that the US would reach the moon before the end of the decade, the fire on the Apollo 1 spacecraft, the moon landing, and contemporary research on the moon. The collection includes interviews with astronauts, engineers, flight directors, geologists, and lunar scientists, including Buzz Aldrin, astronaut on the Apollo 11 moon landing; Jim Lovell, astronaut and commander of the Apollo 13 mission; Gene Kranz, former NASA flight director; Robin M. Canup, astrophysicist; Farouk El-Baz, lunar scientist who worked on the Apollo program; and Dr. Gordon Swann, geologist with the US Geological Survey (USGS) and Principal Investigator of Lunar Geology during Apollo 14 and 15. Subjects include the moon; the Cold War; the origins of the moon and Earth; the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs; terrestrial and lunar geology; President John F. Kennedy; and NASA. The Creative Commons license is subject only to the narrative text within the Resource. Third-party images, audio, video and other materials within the Resource for which AAPB has received permission to include in the resource are not subject to the Creative Commons license.

Subject:
American Studies
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Communication
Education
Electronic Technology
History
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
American Archive of Public Broadcasting
Provider Set:
Special Collections
Author:
WGBH (Boston)
Date Added:
05/07/1998