Updating search results...

Search Resources

49 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Connecticut Humanities
America's Most Devastating Conflict: King Philip's War
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Considered one of America's most devestating conflicts, King Philip's War had years-long impacts for colonists, and deep-lasting ramifications for Native populations of Southern New England for centuries.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Mike Messina
Date Added:
08/12/2019
The Amistad
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

After slaves revolted and took control of the Amistad in 1839, Americans captured the ship off Long Island and imprisoned the slaves in New Haven. A US Supreme Court trial in which Roger Sherman Baldwin and John Quincy Adams defended the slaves, ultimately won them their freedom.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Connecticut Humanities
Date Added:
08/24/2020
Catharine Beecher, Champion of Women's Education
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Sister to two of the most famous figures of the 19th century - Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry Ward Beecher - Catharine Esther Beecher achieved fame in her own right as an educator, reformer, and writer.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Michael Sturges
Date Added:
09/05/2019
Causes of the Pequot War
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The outbreak of the Pequot War (1636-37) is best understood through an examination of the cultural, political, and economic changes that occurred after the arrival of the Dutch in 1611 and the English in the early 1630s.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center
Date Added:
11/28/2012
The Charter of 1662
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The Connecticut Charter, which provided the basis for Connecticut government until 1818, was secured because of Connecticut's realization after the restoration of Charles II to the English throne in 1660 that the government of the colony lacked any legal foundation.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Bruce P. Stark
Date Added:
07/18/2019
The Connecticut River
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The Connecticut River is the longest river in New England, and for thousands of years, the its abundant resources have drawn inhabitants who shaped and reshaped the surrounding area in meaningful, albeit not always positive, ways.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Connecticut Humanities
Date Added:
04/28/2020
Connecticut's "The Legend of the Charter Oak"
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Charter Oak Bridge. Charter Oak State College. Charter Oak Park. Why are so many places and things in Connecticut named after a tree? It all stems from one of Connecticut's most famous legends.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Connecticut Humanities
Author:
Erin Strogoff
Date Added:
06/09/2013