Updating search results...

Search Resources

24 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Activity: Keep the Question Going
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This game involves students generating questions collaboratively. The exercise runs easily for about ten minutes and can go for a half hour or more with discussion. It is often a good exercise to use early in the year, as it helps students listen to each other and gets them thinking about what makes a question a good one.
The activity begins as a simple ‘energizer’ type exercise meant to get students listening to each other while keeping in mind the importance of questions in philosophical inquiry. It requires students to listen to each other and respond in a manner that constructs a coherent sentence – in this case a question.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
David Shapiro
Jana Mohr Lone
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Aesthetics is for the Birds
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Defining what art is. - What do you consider to be art? Can anything be art? This lesson is aimed at garnering an understanding of what art is and how we conceptualize art. This can take many forms depending on the age of the students, but the objective remains the same.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2018
Animal Minds: Puzzling over Puppies and Parrots
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

For much of modern science, since the Enlightenment, animals were generally thought to be automatons: materialist robots programmed to behave in certain ways. Rene Descartes drew a sharp distinction between thinking beings, humans, and everything else, matter. 20th Century behaviorism continued to think of animals in this way but added humans to the mix. “Mind” was a myth, a “ghost in the machine“, and did not really exist. All that counted was behavior and we did not think to complicate science by positing a “mind” behind the actions.
But in recent decades the question of the animal mind has come to the fore again. The question of an animal mind is a difficult one:
You want to avoid anthropomorphizing species by claiming similarities to our experiences simply on the basis that they look similar.
You want also to avoid denying similarities just because they are, well, animals and not humans.
Connected to this are a set of wonderful questions about consciousness, the marks of mind, intentionality, self-awareness, and the basic challenge for us of understanding a being which is not completely analogous to a human and may be quite alien. Think: snakes, mosquitos, fish.
This lesson will introduce students to a reading from National Geographic online on animal minds and a TED video on animal awareness by Franz DeWaal. Use these two sources to get students discussing the criteria for a mind, the scientific process of testing hypotheses, and the important questions about how we can know.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Are we in Control? Hegel’s Lordship & Bondage
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Quite often we find ourselves in situations where we know we are not in control, such as being a student, or having a job, or being bullied. The most important factor in this is the perspective you as an individual bring to the situation. In this lesson, we are not discussing the merits of any social situation, though this is of course a fundamental part in any situation. The purpose is for the student to discover ways to understand what roles are possible in situations involving control/being controlled and choosing how to act in the situation.
This lesson unfolds over multiple sections to engage in a deep reading of Hegel and the real world applications of his thought. Each section will take one or more days, depending on the educator’s approach and the engagement of the students. It is strongly urged that if the students are particularly engaged in a specific section, do not cut the lesson short.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Jonathan Ficaro
Scott Henstrand
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Beauty- Thinking About
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

When it comes to discussions about what is beauty we go fairly quickly to the adage “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” This relativist stance is reassuring in that it signals beauty can mean many different things and to different people. Our taste, whatever it might be, is thereby legitimizing and arguing about beauty in any manifestation (nature, art, human beings) becomes unnecessary and impossible. But is that too glib a response and too fast a move? What are we saying when we label anything as beautiful? That is, what are the markers that generate the response to something as beautiful?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2018
Big Questions and How We Answer Them
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This activity begins by grouping students into groups of three or four. Each student is handed a blank index card and each group is handed an index card on which is written one of the following questions:
Do you have to see, hear, or touch something in order to believe it exists?
Are you responsible for the environment?
Are mistakes good or bad?
Should you always agree with your friends?
What is more important, to be happy or to do the right thing?
Are numbers real?
Is life fair?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Jana Mohr Lone
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Can Animals Make Music?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

We all love music. Some of us sing daily, if just to ourselves. It could be our favorite tune from Frozen or simply a tune we made up ourselves. What makes sound music? Let’s start with ourselves.
The teacher/facilitator may wish to share this video and have the children sing along or they may choose to invite students to sing their own songs or simply offer examples of what music.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2018
Can Anyone Make Art?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In 2007 an independent film came out entitled “My Kid could paint that.” It followed the art career of a four year old, Marla Olmstead, living in Binghamton, NY who took the art world by storm. Many of her canvases sold for 5 figures and presented beautiful and engaging abstract images. The film began as a story of Marla, the pint-size Picasso, but developed into something quite serious. Who defines what is art? Can I child really be a “genuine” artist? Can anyone paint like Picasso? Is modern art a big hoax foisted on an unsuspecting public?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2018
Can We be Authentic in Everyday Life?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Jean-Paul Sartre came to define post-war Existentialism. In this prominent editorial published shortly after the occupation ended, Sartre articulates both the context to his views and the suggestion that everyday life may present even more challenges to real “Existential Choice.” After watching this short video, read the essay and answer the discussion questions below.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Stephen Kekoa Miller
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Crash: An Ethical Obstacle Course
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Crash, directed by Paul Haggis, weaves together the lives of several characters from multiple backgrounds who collide in the busy, often chaotic city of Los Angeles. The movie revolves around a dozen or so characters from various ethnic, racial, and cultural background whose lives entwine and entangle, often with unpleasant consequences. In the film, racism and prejudice are multi-directional and layered. No single character is innocent; racist characters are heroic; sympathetic characters perform immoral acts. Crash, winner of best picture in 2004, is notable for its ethical complexity. In Crash, life is a mess; right and wrong are hard to discern; ethical choices are complex.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
William Mottolese
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Ethical Relativism
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Many students come to the classroom assuming values are variant. Have you heard any of the following?
After all, we are all different, right?
Wouldn’t it be boring if we all believed the same thing?
To each his own!
Celebrate diversity?
Who am I to judge someone else if they feel they are doing the right thing?
These are common beliefs and claims and often come from a good place: the desire to be open-minded and accepting of others. And indeed, in many areas of our life, we should acknowledge diversity is simply cultural, religious, or personally grounded. Can I really make you agree that blue is the best color or that broccoli tastes delicious? I bet not!
So, where are we when it comes to ethical values? Ethical relativism claims that all values are depended on what people believe or accept—not just matters of taste like food and colors. Watch the video posted at the bottom; it offers some great clarifying definitions. Have your students watch this video and then discuss wheat they think about values.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Wendy C. Turgeon
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Exploring Existential Angst and the Self in Social Media
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will be introduced to Existentialism through discussion and excerpts from Jean-Paul Sartre’s novel, Nausea, which describes a certain vague feeling the main character, Roquentin, calls “nausea”. This feeling is basically a result of suspecting that there is a reality behind what we perceive as reality, an objective and subjective reality or Self. Realizing that upon piercing the veil of existence, there’s a subjective reality that we alone are responsible for creating – this creates a freedom, but also a burden and anxiety or nausea. That subjectivity (or the word “contingency” is used in Nausea) is the 1st principle of Existentialism. You may want to read some additional information to become more familiar with these ideas yourself. We recommend Sartre’s Existentialism is a Humanism for you, or even as extended reading for students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Christine Onofrey
Kelly Mansfield
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Fair or Equal?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Begin the exercise by holding up the bag of candy (make sure you have enough for at least one piece for every student) and ask, “What’s the fair way to distribute the candy in this bag? Who all should get a piece?”
Usually, students will agree that everyone should get the same number of pieces. (Occasionally, a student will—usually half in jest—claim that he or she ought to get the whole bag; this naturally doesn’t fly with his or her classmates and a discussion about why it’s not right can ensue.)
After talking about the fair way to distribute the sweets, pass out the candy according to the decision of the group. After giving students a few moments to enjoy their treat, ask, “Is everyone getting the same thing always the fair way? Are there situations in which it’s okay for people to be treated differently?”

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
David Shapiro
Jana Mohr Lone
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020
“Hey Little Ant” Lesson Plan
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In considering whether it is right or wrong to harm or kill a (non-human) animal or even a bug, people may argue for criteria that distinguish between human beings and animals to justify the difference in treatment, like human beings are bigger, stronger, more intelligent, have language, have the ability to reason, or can manipulate their surroundings to their advantage over others. Even if the differences are true, how does the difference make it morally right to harm or kill another? Just because one person is more intelligent than another person, it does not make it morally permissible to kill the other person; so being more intelligent is not relevant to justify killing another. Generally, we would agree that differences within humans are acceptable, and we do not kill others because we respect their humanity and view other human beings as equals. If we agree that human beings deserve equal treatment and respect, then why does this reasoning not extend to (non-human) animals and even to bugs?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Jessica Manzo
Date Added:
04/27/2020
In-Class Ethics Bowl
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson can engage students in the process of dissecting and discussing ethical issues. In a philosophy course, this activity can be used several times throughout a unit about ethics/applied ethics or it can be a culminating activity for the whole unit. In addition, this activity can be modified to fit into other courses to facilitate full class or small group discussions related to specific ethical topics or issues.
Issues that have been included in former Ethics Bowl cases are related to student lives, the role of government in the lives of citizens, and international relations. There are many cases available, so that the bowl can be tailored to specific topics and/or levels of student knowledge or interest. The National High School Ethics Bowl case archive lists many useful cases: http://nhseb.unc.edu/nhseb-rules/case-archive/

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Jana Mohr Lone
Mary Moran
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020
James Joyce’s “Araby”: Coming out of the Cave
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

“Araby” is one of the most widely taught short stories from James Joyce’s Dubliners. Told in the first person from the perspective of a boy in his early teens who has an infatuation with a neighborhood girl (Mangan’s sister), “Araby” ends with a dark epiphany. The boy, who envisioned himself on a quest to purchase the girl some trinket at an Arab bazaar, ends up seeing himself as “a creature derided by vanity.” This complex story raises some fascinating literary questions about:
Narrative point of view. The boy’s narrative voice is at once that of an adolescent and that of an older individual looking back on this episode in his life.
Joyce’s method of “Scrupulous Meanness,” the economical Flaubertian attention to detail, in which all details resonate with symbolic or psychological meaning.
Myth and Genre. The boy departs on an archetypal quest to gain a prize for his “princess.”
Desire and male gaze. The reader follows the boy’s eyes as they settle suggestively on the often glowing features and body parts of Mangan’s sister.
Sociological realism. The novel depicts the “blind” streets and daily rituals of the Dublin residents.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
William Mottolese
Date Added:
04/27/2020
On Friendship
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Pass out one index card to each student. Instruct the students to draw, without using representations of people (including stick figures, faces, and the like), a creative representation of a good friendship. Have the students then discuss their drawings in small groups, with each student explaining why his/her drawing is a representation of a good friendship.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Heather Van Wallendael
Jana Mohr Lone
Kelsey Satchel Kaul
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020
On the Beautiful and the The Sublime
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

One of the longstanding questions that’s been debated in the field of aesthetics involves the nature of Beauty; one question in this area asks us where Beauty lies, in the object or in our eyes. Taking this further, if Beauty is in us rather than in the world, what kind of thing IS it? One strand of thought involves understanding Beauty as a form of Subjective Experience. Beginning with Longinus, and continuing through Burke and Kant and on into the 20th Century, some have suggested that Aesthetic Experience can be divided into two types — the experience of the Beautiful and the The Sublime. One key place these two differ is in the effect on the experiencer –> generally it is thought that the Beautiful is consonant and the The Sublime is dissonant, that the Beautiful reaffirms our Reason, that the The Sublime, however, puts us in touch with the fact that we are in some ways at odds with nature, but that ultimately, this dissonance can be resolved through our expression of human freedom outside of the laws of nature.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Stephen Kekoa Miller
Date Added:
04/27/2018
Personal Identity in Memento
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

I ask students to bring their baby or early childhood pictures to class. After they try matching names with images of their classmates, I ask a question about their own picture: Are you the same person today that you were at the moment captured in your photo. Students readily admit that their physical appearance and mental life have changed dramatically. They concede that they are not qualitatively identical today with the person in the photo, but most insist that that the adolescent they see in their selfie is numerically identical with the child in the photo. Childhood and adolescence are two stages in the life of one person, not two distinct persons that might bear a family resemblance.
What justification can be given for this conclusion? In other words, what persistence conditions are necessary and sufficient for (numerical) personal identity over time?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Steven Goldberg
Date Added:
04/27/2020
Stereotyping
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Ask your students to think about how they define a stereotype. Work in small groups to come up with a basic definition. Have your students write this definition down. After small group discussion, write each group’s definition on the board and discuss commonalities and differences.
Activity
For this part of the discussion, you will use a “silent discussion” technique. Each group should have about five people in it. After reading the example as a class, pose the first question (see below).
Students have one minute to respond to the question(s) on their own piece of paper. After responding, they must pass it to the student on their left. (Feel free to change the order or direction of passing for different questions, so students can respond to different classmates). Students will pass the paper four times or until it returns to the original person. Then everyone gets time to read what was written on their pages. Be sure to encourage students to respond directly to the statement(s) that have just been made during the writing periods.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization (PLATO)
Provider Set:
PLATO Philosopher's Toolkit
Author:
Heather Van Wallendael
Jana Mohr Lone
Kelsey Satchel Kaul
Michael D. Burroughs
Date Added:
04/27/2020