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Humanities in Class Webinar Series

The Humanities in Class Webinar Series offers educators at all levels direct access to lead scholars and experts in the field to discuss topics and themes in the humanities.  Each 90-minute webinar is recorded and made accessible in this collection.

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The 1950s and the Cold War
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In the early years of the Cold War, fear of the Soviet Union led some Americans to conclude that Soviet subversion was destroying American society from within. If not actual spies, then certainly enemies — some deliberate apostles of Communism, others unwitting dupes — were everywhere: in the universities, in the entertainment industry, in journalism, even in the federal government. What fueled the anti-Communist frenzy? How did it manifest itself? What impact did it have on American life?

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Steve Whitfield
Date Added:
02/19/2012
The 1950's in American History and Memory: The Way We Never Were
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How do we remember the 1950s? As the climax of the American Century, when returning GIs and their wives settled into suburbia to have lots of children and enjoy the fruits of living in the only major industrial power left standing after World War II? Or as an age of conformity and anxiety, when anyone who challenged the status quo was suspect and Americans were poised to retreat to fall-out shelters? Or both? Join us to explore how we remember those mid-century years and learn why those memories matter now.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Volker Janssen
Date Added:
03/17/2016
The 19th Amendment at 100: A Centennial Reassessment, Focusing on Sex, Race, and Memory
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The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
Law
Legal History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
09/25/2020
19th Amendment at 100: A Centennial Reassessment, Focusing on Sex, Race, and Memory (Webinar Resources)
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The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.These readings support the webinar of the same title featuring Kimberly Hamlin, Associate Professor of History, Miami University of Ohio.

Subject:
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
Andy Mink
NHC Education
Date Added:
09/03/2020
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #1—The Myth of Seneca Falls
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Clip 1/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #2—Helen H Gardener
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Clip 2/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #3—The Colorado Example
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Clip 3/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #4—HHG in DC
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Clip 4/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
The 19th Amendment at 100 Clip #5—Passing the 19th Amendment
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Clip 5/5. The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which removed “sex” as a legal reason to disqualify citizens from voting. Centennial celebrations have revealed how little most Americans know about the history of women’s rights and how contested this history remains. For the past 100 years, suffrage history has been marginalized and narrowly focused on a few white leaders. But recent scholarship has upended the standard narrative of suffrage, which starts with the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and focuses on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. This webinar will incorporate new research on suffrage, highlighting sex and race. Drawing on the book Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener (W.W. Norton, 2020), we will consider how the sexual double standard motivated activists, how the 19th Amendment got through Congress, and how racism shaped the suffrage movement and its legacy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Kimberly Hamlin
Date Added:
05/25/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage
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History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #1—Introduction
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Clip 1/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #2—Family Papers
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Clip 2/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #3—Portraits
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Clip 3/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #4—Correspondence
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Clip 4/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage Clip #5—White House Years
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Clip 5/5. History has treated the founding of the United States as an exclusively male enterprise. One reason for this is that biographers and historians mostly focus on the political, military, and diplomatic aspects of the era. Scant attention is paid to the social world where women primarily functioned. The story of Abigail and John Adams changes the narrative by examining their remarkable fifty-four year marriage in the context of the Revolutionary and Federal periods, shifting the historical lens to their family. This is possible because, alone among the wives of the founders, Abigail Adams’ hundreds of letters have survived. Abigail wrote elegant, poignant, picturesque prose, and John Adams wrote back. John was undoubtedly the greatest literary stylist among the founders. The story of their marriage set into the context of their time provides a more complete narrative of the Revolution and early National Era.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Edith Gelles
Date Added:
06/01/2021
Addiction in American History
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Drug education has traditionally been delivered by science and health teachers who present scientific research regarding drugs' physiological effects. This webinar explores the ways in which the humanities can provide essential historical context for understanding addiction as a medical condition and help students and citizens better interpret narratives of addiction and recovery. After presenting an overview of the history of addiction in the United States, we will consider how this framework can inform the way we teach about social movements and works of literature. Join us to discover what the humanities have to offer contemporary conversations about addiction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine, and Nursing
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Claire D. Clark
Date Added:
02/28/2019
Addiction in American History Clip #1—Why Learn about Addiction in American History
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Clip 1/5. Drug education has traditionally been delivered by science and health teachers who present scientific research regarding drugs' physiological effects. This webinar explores the ways in which the humanities can provide essential historical context for understanding addiction as a medical condition and help students and citizens better interpret narratives of addiction and recovery. After presenting an overview of the history of addiction in the United States, we will consider how this framework can inform the way we teach about social movements and works of literature. Join us to discover what the humanities have to offer contemporary conversations about addiction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine, and Nursing
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Claire D. Clark
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Addiction in American History Clip #2—Addiction Has its Own History
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Clip 2/5. Drug education has traditionally been delivered by science and health teachers who present scientific research regarding drugs' physiological effects. This webinar explores the ways in which the humanities can provide essential historical context for understanding addiction as a medical condition and help students and citizens better interpret narratives of addiction and recovery. After presenting an overview of the history of addiction in the United States, we will consider how this framework can inform the way we teach about social movements and works of literature. Join us to discover what the humanities have to offer contemporary conversations about addiction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine, and Nursing
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Claire D. Clark
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Addiction in American History Clip #3—Using ATOD History to Interpret Political Cartoons
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Clip 3/5. Drug education has traditionally been delivered by science and health teachers who present scientific research regarding drugs' physiological effects. This webinar explores the ways in which the humanities can provide essential historical context for understanding addiction as a medical condition and help students and citizens better interpret narratives of addiction and recovery. After presenting an overview of the history of addiction in the United States, we will consider how this framework can inform the way we teach about social movements and works of literature. Join us to discover what the humanities have to offer contemporary conversations about addiction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine, and Nursing
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Claire D. Clark
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Addiction in American History Clip #4—Using ATOD History to Interpret a Poem
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Clip 4/5. Drug education has traditionally been delivered by science and health teachers who present scientific research regarding drugs' physiological effects. This webinar explores the ways in which the humanities can provide essential historical context for understanding addiction as a medical condition and help students and citizens better interpret narratives of addiction and recovery. After presenting an overview of the history of addiction in the United States, we will consider how this framework can inform the way we teach about social movements and works of literature. Join us to discover what the humanities have to offer contemporary conversations about addiction.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine, and Nursing
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
Humanities in Class: Webinar Series
Author:
Claire D. Clark
Date Added:
09/29/2020