All resources in Contested Territory: America's Role in Southeast Asia, 1945-75

Contested Patriotisms: Dissent and Nationalism on the U.S. Homefront

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Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Southeast Asia, 1945–1975 explores worlds transformed through radical social change and the tense relations it produced. The full value of this work, though, is the way in which we will consistently set it against the current dominant understanding of why and how America arrived in Vietnam during the Truman administration. While on the surface this expanded timeline might seem localized and outside of the margins of secondary level curriculum, our goal is to explore and counterbalance the linear narrative that most teachers follow of Kennedy, Johnson, Tet, Nixon and the fall of Saigon. Only through this immersive understanding of the complex human and cultural geography of southeast Asia can teachers begin to lead students on an investigation of the cause and effect of the global dynamic—and to have humanities-based resources and materials available to draw evidentiary conclusions.This seminar focused on the contested language and culture of U.S. homefront dissent.

Material Type: Lecture Notes, Reading

Author: NHC Education

Vast Area, Sparse People

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Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Southeast Asia, 1945–1975 explores worlds transformed through radical social change and the tense relations it produced. The full value of this work, though, is the way in which we will consistently set it against the current dominant understanding of why and how America arrived in Vietnam during the Truman administration. While on the surface this expanded timeline might seem localized and outside of the margins of secondary level curriculum, our goal is to explore and counterbalance the linear narrative that most teachers follow of Kennedy, Johnson, Tet, Nixon and the fall of Saigon. Only through this immersive understanding of the complex human and cultural geography of southeast Asia can teachers begin to lead students on an investigation of the cause and effect of the global dynamic—and to have humanities-based resources and materials available to draw evidentiary conclusions.

Material Type: Lecture Notes, Primary Source

Author: Christian Lentz

Spring-Watching Pavilion

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It is believed that Ho Xuan Huong wrote "Spring-Watching Pavilion" sometime in the late 1700s or early 1800s in her native Vietnam. Her poems were copied by hand for almost a century, and were originally published in Vietnamese in a woodblock edition in 1909. However, they were not published as type until 2000, when John Balaban translated them into English and published them in the United States in Spring Essence: The Poetry of Ho Xuan Huong. This publication was historic for many reasons. It was the first time Ho Xuan Huong's poems had been published in the United States and it was the first time they had been published in English. Perhaps most importantly, Balaban and his publisher included versions of the poems in both English and Vietnamese, as well as the original version in Nom—the nearly extinct ideographic Vietnamese script in which Ho Xuan Huong wrote her poetry. Spring Essence was the first publication in history to print Nom as type, and its publication was lauded by scholars, popular readers, and even President Clinton, who commented on the cultural importance of the book at his own historic visit to Vietnam in 2000.

Material Type: Lecture Notes, Reading

Author: NHC Education

Evolution of Vietnamese Writing Scripts & Its Role in the 1945 National Revolution

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Led by Kimloan Hill, Lecturer of Viet Heritage Program, University of California, San Diego, this session will examine the development and evolution of Vietnamese speaking and writing languages in relation to the development and evolution of Vietnamese social and political history. There have been three writing scripts in Vietnam: chữ Hán[Chinese script] used during the 1,000 years of Chinese domination of what today is known as Vietnam;from the 11thcentury until the early 20thcenturychữ Nôm[writing of the South = Việt Nam], which was created by borrowing two Chinese words to create a Vietnamese word; and finally Quốc Ngữ[National Language], which was createdby Western missionariesin the 17thcenturyby using Latin script, but which did not become theofficial scriptuntil 1917 under French rule. 

Material Type: Lecture Notes

Authors: Andy Mink, NHC Education