All resources in Meaningful Teaching and Learning in the Humanities Classroom (July 2022)

Learning from the struggle: Relational connections and the role of ethnic studies in learning about social movements

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"The social uprising in the summer of 2020 in the United States was arguably the most salient resurgence of a civil rights movement in recent memory. Despite a global pandemic that has negatively impacted millions in this country and beyond, many people took to the streets to call for an end to the shooting of black people, advocated for racial justice, the defunding of police departments, and the eradication of structural racism. Since the creation of the hashtag Black Lives Matter in 2013, founders Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi have attempted to center the experiences of people at the margins–women, queer and trans lives, and victims of police misconduct regardless of their criminal backgrounds–carefully not falling into the binary discourse of worthy citizens to “signal an ethos of inclusiveness and a desire for a fundamental rearrangement of power relations” (Rickford, 2016, p. 37). The Black Lives Matter movement highlights the ongoing struggle for racial justice, demonstrating that for the movement’s success, there is a need to transform all aspects of oppressive social relations."

Material Type: Primary Source

Authors: NHC Education, Anyeline Mejia-McDonald

Teaching for Diversity: Strategies to Decolonize the Undergraduate Classroom Syllabus

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This workshop will emphasize ways to normalize diversity in the undergraduate classroom by incorporating diversity into the very design of the course, through student learning outcomes, course readings, lectures, and assignments. Teaching for diversity involves more than adding a few writers of color on a syllabus (although that is a GREAT place to start!). It also is about engaging human variety in every aspect of course content.

Material Type: Lecture Notes

Authors: Andy Mink, NHC Education

Humanities and Community Interdisciplinary Approaches to Interpretation and Creation

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We have created this course with Ethics of Care as our core value. As such, we are committed to increasing accessibility, creating an antiracist and decolonized curriculum and community, and to the foster imagination and kindness. Also within this Ethics of Care, we are committed to self-care, and care for and responsibilities to our communities and to future communities.

Material Type: Syllabus

Authors: Jordan Dopkins, Vanessa Madrigal Lauchland, Daun Fields, Bailey Boyd

Remix

GSSR 2022 Group Project: Designing an Interdisciplinary Humanities Course Syllabus

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This cross-disciplinary and cross-institutional collaboration culminates in an authentic shareable product for the NHC’s Humanities in Class Digital Library. Through the assignment, graduate students have the opportunity to develop instructional materials on a compelling scholarly topic and to identify consensus among humanities disciplines. The assignment is intended to provide valuable practice in translating scholarly concepts for novice learners and in practicing inquiry-driven pedagogy. We hope that the experience will support graduate students as they form professional networks with their peers and connect with fellow NHC scholars by distributing these resources.

Material Type: Syllabus

Author: NHC Education

Beyond Civil Rights: Dr. Martin Luther King’s Activism in the 1960s Clip #4—On Critical Race Theory

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Clip 4/4. The work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is largely taught in the context of the Civil Rights Movement. Students are familiar with the iconic events of in Washington D.C., Selma, and Birmingham. However, we focus less on his dedication to other causes, including the anti-Vietnam War activism and the Poor People’s Campaign. Historian Peniel Joseph provides insights in Dr. King’s work in addition to his leadership in the fight for Civil Rights.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Peniel Joseph

Racism in America: A Reader

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Racism in America has been the subject of serious scholarship for decades. The excerpts in this volume—culled from works of history, law, sociology, medicine, economics, critical theory, philosophy, art, and literature—are an invitation to understand anti-Black racism through the eyes of our most incisive commentators.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Andy Mink, NHC Education

HUMN XXX: Migration and Transculturation

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In this 14-week, upper-level undergraduate humanities course “Migration and Transculturation,” students explore the process whereby a new cultural reality emerges from multiple cultures sharing the same space. Throughout this course, students will engage with transcultural theory as it relates to the fields of literature, linguistics, religion, and history. Students’ exploration of Fernando Ortiz’s theoretical concept will include issues such as race, gender, hybridity, identity, (de)coloniality, inequality, and sexuality. Through the analysis of the contact between various cultures, races, languages, ideologies, religions, and traditions within a shared geographical and digital space, students will be asked to consider the contributions of different peoples and critically engage with the construction of identity.

Material Type: Syllabus

Authors: Katerina Santiesteban, Joe Hurley

What Can Richard Pryor and Archie Bunker Teach Us about Teaching Offensive Language? (webinar resources)

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Richard Pryor may have been the most unlikely star in Hollywood history. Raised in his family’s brothels, in Peoria, Illinois, he could alchemize his stand-up by delving fully, even painfully, into the “off-color” life he'd known. Starring bigoted Archie Bunker, “All in the Family” won numerous Emmys and Golden Globe awards until it ended in 1979. Humor is tricky. It often offends, sometimes deliberately. But humor also has the capability to keep open dialogue about racial and other sensitive issues and to promote self-awareness. Scott Saul will discuss ways in which language and expression can shift in the cultural and political context of eras, geographies, and current events. Using Richard Pryor’s comedy and All in the Family as case studies, we will explore how comedy, by articulating the unsayable, challenges us to confront the taboos in our culture.

Material Type: Reading

Author: NHC Education

Defund the Police: Protest Slogans and the Terms for Debate

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The deaths of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd have inspired Americans and people throughout the world to take to the streets in protest against police brutality. In the course of what might be the largest movement for civil rights since the 1960s, many activists have issued calls to “defund the police” in response to police killings of Black Americans. This demand and slogan has generated much debate, just as Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee activist Stokely Carmichael’s call for “Black Power” did in 1967. In this webinar, we will use Carmichael’s concept of “Black Power,” and the ensuing debate around that slogan, to think about how we can use history to understand contemporary social movements and protests. This will contribute to a broader examination of the purpose and significance of terminology in activism and a look at how speech and framing can help to reshape political culture.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Austin McCoy

Transforming the Classroom with Universal Design

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Although many of us type, text, and email every day, it’s not widely known that these revolutionary practices were originally designed for and by disabled people. Similarly, in education, when we design courses to meet the needs of disabled students, learning tends to improve for many students. This workshop introduces Universal Design for Learning (UDL), an educational framework that assumes students are different and thus builds classrooms with those differences in mind.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Anne-Marie Womack

The UDL Guidelines

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"The UDL Guidelines are a tool used in the implementation of Universal Design for Learning, a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn. Learn more about the Universal Design for Learning framework from CAST. The UDL Guidelines can be used by educators, curriculum developers, researchers, parents, and anyone else who wants to implement the UDL framework in a learning environment. These guidelines offer a set of concrete suggestions that can be applied to any discipline or domain to ensure that all learners can access and participate in meaningful, challenging learning opportunities."

Material Type: Primary Source

Author: CAST

Universal Design in a Virtual Environment

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Many of us type and text every day, yet it’s not widely known that the typewriter was developed for a blind woman and texting was developed for deaf users. These devices revolutionized technology by enabling disabled writers. Similarly, when educators design classrooms to include disabled students, we often create stronger classrooms overall. This workshop introduces graduate instructors to an educational framework called Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL assumes students are different and builds classrooms with those differences in mind. The goal--as illustrated in this image of a street sign--is to create an “accessible route” when there is a “steep grade ahead.” (If you encounter access issues, email me at amwomack@gmail.com.)

Material Type: Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Authors: Andy Mink, NHC Education, Anne-Marie Womack

Accessible Syllabus

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It’s common for instructors to complain that students don’t read the syllabus, but take one look at contemporary syllabi and it’s not hard to see why. If we were to design the document more accessibly, though, might students use it more effectively? This workshop guides instructors through accessible syllabus strategies including multimodal content, effective document design, and inclusive rhetoric and policies. Part I focuses on inclusive images and text, while Part II focuses on language and policies.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Anne-Marie Womack