All resources in NHC College/University Faculty Podcasting Institutes

In My Solitude

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“In my Solitude” addresses the topic of faculty solitude within academia and, in particular, faculty solitude during the COVID-19 pandemic. In their conversation, the authors explore spaces of fulfilment in music, ceramic, and family. The feeling of solitude is intertwined with other emotions and with the person’s well-being. Illness is present as a consequence of solitude: depression, anxiety, and detachment, among others. Music by Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Carmen Urioste-Azcorra, David Anthony

University of Women

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Inspired by Rebecca Solnit’s essay and imaginative map project “City of Women,” three interdisciplinary scholars come together to reflect on, discuss, and imagine what a University of Women might look like. What is a University of Women? It is not necessarily a university consisting only of women-identifying people, though it could be. For our purposes, a  University of Women is a place where women’s knowledge and experiences are centered and vital; where women’s names are etched on buildings and painted on portraits in conference rooms; where women’s contributions to literature, history, art, and the sciences are taught in all classes; where female faculty and staff face no discrimination, are equally paid, support one another’s success, and comprise half (or more!) of  university employees; and where all students are safe from sexual assault  and are free to develop their minds, souls,  and bodies. As far back as Christine de Pizan, who wrote The Book of the City of Ladies in 1405, women have been imagining such places, and the ghosts of our foremothers haunt our campuses. What can these pasts reveal about today, and what might our ideal University of Women look like? Join us as we delve in!

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Kimberly Hamlin, Teri Kennedy, Sheila Coursey

Boxed in and Free

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2020. The year of being boxed in our homes, behind our masks. And yet the year when, because of our confinement, we discovered new imaginary territories and new creative directions. Our four vignettes on the box are but a small sampling of its infinite associations. We find ourselves discussing subscription boxes; in the box atop the key of a basketball court; boxed in by a theater audience; and listening to the sounds outside the boxy house.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Andy Mink, Elise Lonich Ryan, Louis Romer

What's in a Box?

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We’ve been living a life in a box since March 2020, no more noise and boom boxes, but doing everything with our zoom boxes. Thinking outside of the box? This podcast takes us through seven different stories, and tons of boxes, from gift boxes to relic boxes, into a journey in time, as we look into the many boxes of our lives, our past and present. Opening a box is not for the faint-hearted! Join us as we try to figure out: what’s in a box?

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Kisha Tracy, Gina Brandolino, Andromache Karanika, Gregory Parker

Post-Pandemic Academic: Silver Linings

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After a cloudy year of COVID, this episode of The Post-Pandemic Academic, entitled “Silver Linings,” features a conversation among four humanists from a variety of fields and institutions discussing the positive takeaways from the previous months and how we plan to incorporate those in our professional lives going forward. After so much loss, we allow ourselves to engage in a bit of blue sky regarding what the future might hold.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Timothy Stinson, Liz Skilton

Trust

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Trust. How is it earned? How is it shared? How is it given? How is it kept? How is it broken, and how is it squandered? Sharon Daniel, Terza Lima-Neves, Nathaniel Isaacson, and Aims McGuinness share stories about building trust as a key aspect of their personal and professional lives. From university classrooms to state prisons, doctor's offices and government archives, the contributors examine the ways trust plays a role in shaping our lives, our sense of self, and our place in the many communities we negotiate as teachers, artists, historians, advocates, family members, cultural liaisons and human beings.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Nathaniel Isaacson, Sharon Daniel, Terza Lima-Neves, Aims McGuinness

“Me-Search”: Voices of the Second Gen

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This podcast features the voices of four university humanities and arts researchers,  who are what US immigration scholars call “second-generation Americans,” or the U.S.-born children of immigrants. Through storytelling, poetry, and familial voices, this episode broadly explores the intersection of language and identity, with particular attention to questions of exclusion and erasure, survival, and the importance of human connection and legacy. In “Me-Search,” our voices reject any and all notions that our research must be impersonal to be considered legitimate or of value. Instead we embrace the realities of our lived experiences to interrogate how our identities as second-generation Americans are inextricably intertwined both with our research interests and the ways we move in the world.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Tamara Falicov, NHC Education, Erika Lobati, Walton Muyumba, Yuridia Ramirez

Fifteen Months

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What does it mean to survive and maybe even thrive during a global pandemic? How will our personal and shared experiences forever change life going forward? In this episode three faculty members from disparate fields - Russian, anthropology, and film and media studies - discuss the challenges of the past months and find commonalities in addressing isolation, maintaining social connections with family and friends, and learning to let go.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Hilde Hoogenboom, NHC Education

The Elements

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What happens when a historian, a professor in literature, an artist, and a marketing professor get together? A nonlinear conversation about the embodiment of the four elements in California. Earth, Air, Fire, and Water. From immersion to transformation, from trees wearing green sweaters to social justice, this podcast is a journey for the ones who dare to listen.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Paula Peter, Amanda Smith, Ian Coller

A Stranger's Kitchen

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How do we uncover, discover, and tell stories? For Adela Ramos, Paul Skenazy, Craig Friend, and Libby McRae, it is the heart of the house—the kitchen-- that holds the clues.  “A Stranger’s Kitchen,” is a podcast where we examine how an artifact from the kitchen helps us tell stories. In episode one, it is a recipe box and specifically a recipe that unlocks the stories of Maria Adela Gonzalez a beautician and a divorced mother of two, who traveled to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from Guadalajara, Mexico in 1949. Using our different research skills, we tell stories of migrations, assimilations, work, motherhood, consumption, domesticity, culinary landscapes, leisure, and family. Find an old family recipe, mix a cocktail, fix an hors d'oeuvre and join us! (or listen as you cook)

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Adela Ramos, Craig Friend, Paul Skenazy

Free Your Mind: The Future of Drugs

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Free Your Mind: The Future of Drugs is a podcast that explores the history of drug policy and drug use in a globally comparative perspective in order to imagine a decriminalized future. Hosted by Sylvia Tidley, Fernando Esquivel-Suarez, and Kat Charron it considers geopolitics during the Cold War; the War on Drugs in the United States; different approaches to regulating psychotropic drugs in the Netherlands; and whether or not the United States is finally reaching a turning point in its overwhelmingly punitive response to controlled substances. Ultimately, we ask what alternative futures could look like and mean.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Fernando Esquivel-Suarez, Kat Charron, Sylvia Tidey

Animals in the Anthropocene

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Animals in the Anthropocene is a podcast series exploring human-animal connectivity in the face of climate change. We are interconnected in powerful but delicate ways, and your hosts consider these interconnections alongside the particularities of the earth’s inhabitants. In this episode, we consider the horseshoe crab, one of the oldest living species on earth.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Judith Rodenbeck, Brianne Donaldson, Angela Robinson

In the Garden

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“In the Garden” considers gardens and gardening from various perspectives--personal, poetic, spiritual, historical, theoretical—with contributions from Nguyen Tan Hoang (UC San Diego), Larisa Castillo (UC Irvine), Kathleen Lamp (Arizona State University), and Maile Arvin (University of Utah), with narration by Maile Arvin.  As we share our own experiences, we invite listeners to ruminate on their own habits of cultivation.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Kathleen Lamp

Living Remnants

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What do we do with material remains like old clothes, brittle news clippings, locks of hair, fingerprints, and love letters when we discover them tucked away in library archives or dusty attics? Material Hauntings is a podcast about these physical traces of the past and what they teach us about the present and the future. In our first episode, Ke lly Scarff, Amy E-lias, Maggie Cao/Chow, and Stephen Berry tell stories of four haunting objects and how they continue to affect us as mothers, daughters, historians, and witnesses.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Jennifer Erdely

Speak to Me

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Deep and powerful insights into narrative form and historical roots can be located in oral history, epic tale, folklore, and interview-based dramas. Oral and aural-based methodologies blend together to inform transnational literature, history, and culture beginning with Susanna Weygandt’s exploration of Russian docudrama.  Methods of conducting interviews intertwine with Tony Frazier’s approach to researching Black community spaces in Durham, N.C.  and Black Wall Street, which offer central narratives of Durham’s history. Rebecca Hallman Martini brings us home through an interview with Mawihya, a third-generation Haitian American woman living in Houston, to learn about her experiences in Haiti, particularly her experience of being in Haiti during the 2010 earthquake.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Rebecca Hallman Martini

Material Hauntings

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What do we do with material remains like old clothes, brittle news clippings, locks of hair, fingerprints, and love letters when we discover them tucked away in library archives or dusty attics? Material Hauntings is a podcast about these physical traces of the past and what they teach us about the present and the future. In our first episode, Kelly Scarff, Amy Elias, Maggie Cao, and Stephen Berry tell stories of four haunting objects and how they continue to affect us as mothers, daughters, historians, and witnesses.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Kelly Scarff, Stephen Berry, Maggie Cao, Amy Elias

Pandemic Resiliencies: Creating Communities in the Time of Covid

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In this episode of Pandemic Resiliencies: Creating Communities in the Time of Covid, we look at three stories of people, families, and communities that found ways to thrive in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic. We interview London Hardin and Martha Morrisson, co-owners of a local salon in Jacksonville, FL and discuss with them ways that their small business built empathy and community in a scary time. Next, Katie Hodges-Kluck recounts her journey to motherhood, which she shared with Ty Roberts, a doula and reproductive rights activist in Knoxville, TN. Finally, we hear the story of Shauntae Brown White’s family of cousins, originally from the Midwest, but currently spread across the United States and spanning three generations, who reconnected virtually during the pandemic.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Authors: Shauntae White, Sarah Parker, Katie Hodges-Kluck