All resources in NHC Teacher Advisory Council, 2016 - present

Humanities Moments Submission Guide

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The Humanities Moments project was created by the National Humanities Center to explore how moments of inspiration in everyday life are produced, re ned, and even challenged by the humanities. The stories which make up this collection are presented as submitted, capturing the experiences of those who have shared them in their own words — re eating their individual views, interpretations, and conclusions. This submission guide will help you to think through and share your own Humanities Moment.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: National Humanities Center

Humanities Moments

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From an academic standpoint, the humanities include the study of history, philosophy and religion, modern and ancient languages and literatures, fine and performing arts, media and cultural studies, and other fields. Humanities research adds to our knowledge of the world, as scholars investigate differences between cultures and communities around the world and across time, consider the ways art is made and received, or unveil the undercurrents that have shaped history. Humanities education encourages students to think creatively and critically, to reason, and ask questions. And, as the humanities offer insight into nearly every aspect of life, they have been considered a core element of a well-rounded education since ancient times. Put simply, the humanities help us understand and interpret the human experience, as individuals and societies. By illustrating the importance of the humanities for people from all walks of life, the project seeks to reimagine the way we think and talk about the humanities. By highlighting their transformative power, the Humanities Moments project illuminates how our encounters with the humanities fuel the process of discovery, encourage us to think and feel more deeply, and provide the means to solve problems as individuals and as a society.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: National Humanities Center

How I Found Humanity in a Dark Cave

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"The most literal definition of the word humanities as always fascinated me. What could be cooler than getting to the very crux of what it means to be human by studying all the unique, beautiful, and awe inspiring things humanity has created? Humanists get to study the “whoa” and the “wow” moments of the human story. We get to look at something, read something, or hear something, and for a magical instant possibly feel the exact something the creator felt when he or she made that awesome something. How lucky are we?"

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Michelle Kaighn

Why I Read YA

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"I was born and grew up in rural Southern Appalachia. Books and stories were my pathway out of the holler and into a world of hope and possibility. As a child and teen, I read and listened voraciously, and those stories found in books helped to save my life. Without them, I am not sure where I would be right now. During my early years as an adult, I searched for a career that would pair my enthusiasm for literacy and literature with my profession. I finally found that perfect match as a librarian."

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Scot Smith

Humans Give Meaning to the World

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"While discussing N. Scott Momaday's novel A House Made of Dawn, Professor Bowden introduced a new concept - geosophy. It was an unexpected moment during an undergraduate geography class that ultimately opened mental doors and windows to the world. Geosophy, an idea promoted by John Kirtland Wright in the 1940's, "is the study of geographical knowledge from any or all points of view. It is to geography what historiography is to history... it covers the geographical ideas, both true and false, of all manner of people—not only geographers, but farmers and fishermen, business executives and poets, novelists and painters, Bedouins and Hottentots—and for this reason it necessarily has to do in large degree with subjective conceptions."* In short, humans give meaning to the physical world."

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Craig Perrier

The Power of Myth

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Ron Eisenman shares how a PBS television series encouraged him to pursue his passions and turn to the humanities to help him make sense of the world around him. His engagement with "The Power of Myth" helped to connect seemingly disparate cultural contexts by illuminating the shared elements of the stories we tell about ourselves.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Ron Eisenman

“For the Sake of a Cloud”

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"While taking Latin in high school, I became fascinated by the story of the Trojan War. I loved the interconnected perspectives of soldiers, royalty, deities, and ordinary people. The family trees and catalogues of soldiers seemed endless, and I was thrilled to discover that each individual inspired stories, plays, and art. As I began to master the intricacies of the myths, I prided myself on recognizing the differences between movies like “Troy” or Disney’s “Hercules” and the original story. I watched eagerly to notice what they got wrong or right about the myth."

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Skye Shirley

An Epiphany Over a Statue of Gandhi

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"In front of the Martin Luther King Center in Atlanta you’ll find this statue of Mohandas Gandhi. For years I have used a photograph of this statue to introduce our Indian Independence unit to my 7th graders with the prompt “Why is this statue of Gandhi in front of the King Center?” My students are already familiar with the American civil rights movement, and this inquiry was always a great hook to learn about Gandhi’s system of nonviolent civil disobedience, which Dr. King utilized so effectively."

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Rick Parker

Internal Tutorials for HICDL Content Providers

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These temporary videos outline the steps for invited authors and educators to contribute OER to the HICDL during the development stage (April - May 2020).  These videos will be deleted when the site goes public.Videos include how to create an individual profile, how to start a group, how to add OER resources, how to add web resources, and the difference between content provider sets and individual accounts.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Andy Mink