Meaningful Teaching and Learning in the Humanities Classroom

Virtual Graduate Student Summer Residency—July 5-9, 2021

About

This 5-day virtual residency will model best practices for undergraduate teaching in the humanities classroom. Graduate student cohorts will interact and learn from university professionals, and participants will also have opportunities to work with each other through interactive sessions and projects. We will explore design principles students can directly apply to their teaching experiences in the humanities classroom. Topics will include:

  • open education resources (OER)
  • how to build community and relationships
  • student assessments
  • online course design and instruction
  • interactive teaching technologies
  • class evaluations

Code of Conduct

May 6, 2021, 10:22 a.m.

Creating a Welcoming Environment

The program organizers are committed to creating and maintaining an inclusive, harassment-free learning environment for participants of all races and ethnic backgrounds, gender identities and expressions, sexual orientations, physical abilities, physical appearances, socioeconomic backgrounds, nationalities, ages, religions, and beliefs. We strive to provide an environment that’s free from all forms of harassment, including microaggressions. Harassment includes, but is not limited to:

  • Verbal comments and nonverbal expressions that reinforce social structures of domination related to gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, employment status, physical appearance, body size, race, age, religion, marital status, political affiliation, or physical or cognitive ability

  • Bullying behaviors

  • Sexual images in public spaces

  • Deliberate intimidation, stalking, or following

  • Unwanted audio or visual recording

  • Sustained disruption of talks or other events

  • Inappropriate [physical] contact

  • Unwelcome sexual attention

  • Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior

 

Community Agreements

We recognize that we will all make mistakes and may unintentionally harm individuals or groups as we engage as a community, but we agree to take responsibility for the results of our words and actions. We further agree that:

  • We will not speak for others, and we will not ask someone else to speak for others.

  • We will practice active listening and listen more than we individually speak, paying attention to how much space we take up in the room (or virtual room).

  • We value everyone’s voice and encourage everyone to speak up.

  • We will not become defensive when someone shares the effect our communication has on them.

  • We will respect people’s names and gender pronouns.

  • We will give credit where credit is due.

  • We are open to social media use during this Institute, but we will ask before mentioning others in the room or sharing photographs, and we will respect people’s decisions.

 

Collaborating in Virtual Space

We recognize that connecting and collaborating virtually is challenging, between Zoom fatigue and the distractions of email and life. During our time together, we commit to the following additional shared principles:

  • We will strive to be as present as possible during synchronous sessions, while giving ourselves permission to stretch and take breaks for our own well-being.

  • We will give ourselves permission to shut out the world during this institute and we will give ourselves permission to stay present in the world around us.

  • We will try to turn our cameras on as much as possible, but recognize that there are times when we will need to turn them off.

  • We will respect the privacy of our colleagues and peers.

  • We will engage in kind, generative, and compassionate chat speech and avoid using biased or harassing chat.

  • We will avoid posting screenshots of Zoom sessions, Zoom chats, or Slack chats on social media.

 

And, to keep each other safe in the virtual environment, we will:

  • Not share the link to our Zoom meetings or Slack channel with anyone not affiliated with this institute (Zoom bombing is a real thing).

  • Not share the contents of our Zoom chat or Slack communications with folks not affiliated with this institute.

  • Be careful when exchanging files to protect against viruses.

 

Enforcement

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately. If a participant engages in behavior that contravenes this code of conduct, we retain the right to take any actions to keep the event and associated online interactions a welcoming environment for all participants. This includes warning the offender or asking them to leave the event.

 

What to Do

If someone makes you or anyone else feel unsafe or unwelcome, please report it to one of the program organizers as soon as possible. We will not tolerate any violation or circumvention of this code of conduct. We will assist you by contacting venue security or local law enforcement, providing escorts, or otherwise helping you to feel safe. To report incidents after the conclusion of our Institute, please email Andy Mink at amink@nationalhumanitiescenter.org. All reports and inquiries will be handled in confidence.

This Code of Conduct was inspired by, and borrows heavily from, the HuMetrics HSS Code of Conduct and the ACRL Digital Scholarship Section Community Agreement.

The following is a preview of scheduled live sessions. Please mark these live events on your calendar. All live sessions will be held on Zoom, at this link.
All times are listed in Eastern. See this time zone converter if you need help determining your local time.

We will publish a slate of daily self-paced activities by 8:00pm EDT each night.  These materials will be found in the resource folder in the VGSWR Group (access at bottom of this page). 

Date

Time

Syncronous Activity

Format

July 5, DAY 1 

TEACHING: WHY IT MATTERS    

11:00

Opening Session with Andy Mink

Zoom

View the recording of the morning session by clicking the link here.

11:30 

Welcome with Robert Newman

Zoom

 

12:00 

 

2:30 

Passionate Teaching in a Research Environment with Tera Hunter, Professor of History, Princeton University, NHC Fellow 2017-18 

Humanizing the Idol – Rivi Handler-Spitz, Associate Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures, Macalester College, NHC Fellow 2020-21

Zoom

 

3:30 

 

 

Transforming the Classroom with Universal Design– Anne-Marie Womack, Professor of Practice, Tulane University

Although many of us type and text every day, it’s not widely known that these revolutionary practices were originally designed for disabled people. Similarly, in education, when we design courses to include disabled people, learning tends to improve for everyone. This workshop introduces Universal Design for Learning (UDL), an educational framework that assumes students are different and thus builds classrooms with those differences in mind.

Zoom

 

4:00 

4:30 

5:00 

Group Project Introduction – Andy Mink

Breakout Discussion #1 “Introduction: Teaching to Transgress” & Chapter 1 “Engaged Pedagogy” (22 pages; p. 1-22) 

Group Work Time

Zoom

July 6, DAY 2 

PREPARING FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE CLASSROOM

View the recording of the morning session by clicking the link here

11:00

11:30 

 

12:00

12:30

 

 

 

 

Group Facilitation and OER Introduction – Andy Mink

Breakout Discussion #2: Chapter 3 “Embracing Change: Teaching in a Multicultural World” (35-44) & Chapter 12 “Confronting Class in the Classroom” (13 pages; p. 177-90) 

Independent Group Time

Lunch Circles: Vignettes of Undergraduate Teaching

-Anton Matytsin, Assistant Professor of History, University of Florida, NHC Fellow 2018-19

-Emily Lutenski, Associate Professor of American Studies, St. Louis University, NHC Fellow 2019-20

-Jennifer Williams, Assistant Professor of English, Howard University, NHC Fellow 2018-19

-Shuang Shen, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Chinese, Penn State University, NHC Fellow 2018-19

Zoom

View the recording of the afternoon session by clicking the link here.

2:00

4:00 

 

 

 

5:00 

Independent Group Time

How to Create an Accessible Syllabus– Anne-Marie Womack

It’s common for instructors to complain that students don’t read the syllabus, but take one look at contemporary syllabi and it’s not hard to see why. If we were to design the document more accessibly, though, might students use it more effectively? This workshop guides instructors through accessible syllabus strategies including multimodal content, effective document design, and inclusive rhetoric and policies.

Independent Time

Zoom

July 7, DAY 3

THRIVING AND SURVIVING IN THE ONLINE UNDERGRADUATE  CLASSROOM 

View the recording of the morning session by clicking the link here.

11:00 
 

 

 

 

12:00 

Beyond Rubrics: Alternative Assignments and Assessments:  Jordynn Jack, Associate Professor of English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NHC Fellow 2020-21

Tired of rubrics? Bored with traditional essays? This interactive workshop will examine alternatives to common assessment practices. First, we will discuss how authentic assignments build intrinsic motivation. Next, we will consider how to assess student’s work using grading contracts, self-assessments, and other alternative methods that emphasize growth and metacognition.

Independent Group Time

Zoom

 

1:00 

 

 

 

 

2:00 

2:30 

Lunch Circles: Vignettes of Undergraduate Teaching

-Savannah Murray, Assistant Professor of English, Appalachian State University, GSSR 2019

-Brooke Covington, Assistant Professor of English, Christopher Newport University, GSSR 2019

-Kiran Garcha, Assistant Professor of History, University of California, Bakersfield, GSSR 2019

-Sondra Bickham Washington, Assistant Professor of American Literature, Florida Atlantic University, GSSR 2019

Breakout Discussion #3 Chapter 5 “Theory as Liberatory Practice” (17 pages; p. 59-75)

Independent Group Time

Zoom

View the recording of the afternoon session by clicking the link here.

4:00 

A cautious energy: ten years of my critical digital pedagogical journey: Peter Rorabaugh, Assistant Professor of English, Kennesaw State University

Digital literacies and digitally informed pedagogy are ubiquitous and ephemeral. My presentation will describe how I’ve come to understand the value of the web and digital community building and my growing concerns with the co-optive and corporatizing influence of the tech industry on critical digital citizenry.

Zoom

 

5:15 

6:30 

Peer Review Circles and Open Door Hour

Independent Group Time

Zoom

July 8, DAY 4

THE RESPONSIVE CURRICULUM

View the recording of the morning session by clicking the link here.

11:00 

 

 

 

12:00  

Setting the Stage: Optimizing Content for Digital Delivery: Quin Jernigan, Instructional Designer, Digital and Lifelong Learning, UNC-Chapel Hill

You’re teaching a course in a digital format, where do you start? In this session, we will discuss some of the underlying considerations for optimizing content for digital delivery and explore tools that can help you (and your learners) get the most out of digital delivery.

Independent Group Time

Zoom

View the recording of this session by clicking the link here

1:00 

 

 

2:00  

2:30 

Understanding Academic Rigor in the Undergraduate Classroom – Emily McLemore, PhD Candidate in English, Notre Dame University, GSWR 2020

What do we mean when we refer to “academic rigor,” and why does it so often relate to assessment, rather than achievement? Drawing upon universal design principles, this session strives to shift our mindsets as instructors toward a student-centered model of learning that emphasizes individual improvement and incorporates metacognitive practices.

Breakout Discussion #4 Chapter 10 “Building a Teaching Community: A Dialogue” (37 pages; p. 129-65) 

Independent Group Time

Zoom

View the recording of the afternoon session by clicking the link here.

4:00 

Considering the Curriculum – Cassander Smith, Associate Professor of English, University of Alabama

Zoom

 

5:15 

Independent Group Time

Zoom

July 9, DAY 5

THE CONNECTED CLASSROOM  

11:30 

12:00 

Ramp Up Student Thinking with Visual Notes: An Interactive Session – Wendi Pillars

Independent Group Time

Zoom

View the recording of these sessions at the link here.

1:00 

 

 

 

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly with Student Evaluations – Justin Esarey, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, Wake Forest University

In this session, we will discuss what we know about student evaluations of teaching (SETs) and the implications for new faculty members. Our discussion will focus on a review of empirical findings and a simulation-driven demonstration of how SETs might affect a faculty member's career.

Zoom

 

2:00 

Showcase

Zoom

 

3:30 

Future Tense: NHC Fellowship Program with Matthew Booker

Zoom

 

4:00 

Final Thoughts & Next Steps with Andy Mink

Zoom

Participants